A ring-tailed lemur

Ring-tailed lemur

Ring-tailed lemurs are the most easily recognisable of all the lemur species, they're the only ones to have a long, bushy and black-and-white striped tail. Spending more time in open spaces than the other lemurs of Madagascar, ring-tailed lemurs are also very sociable and groups will soak up the early morning sun together, sitting cross-legged in a yoga position. Females share the parental duties in crèches.

Scientific name: Lemur catta

Rank: Species

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Distribution

Map showing the distribution of the Ring-tailed lemur taxa

Species range provided by WWF's Wildfinder.

The Ring-tailed lemur can be found in a number of locations including: Madagascar. Find out more about these places and what else lives there.

Habitats

The following habitats are found across the Ring-tailed lemur distribution range. Find out more about these environments, what it takes to live there and what else inhabits them.

Additional data source: Animal Diversity Web

Conservation Status

Near Threatened

  1. EX - Extinct
  2. EW
  3. CR - Threatened
  4. EN - Threatened
  5. VU - Threatened
  6. NT
  7. LC - Least concern

Population trend: Decreasing

Year assessed: 2008

Classified by: IUCN 3.1

Classification

  1. Life
  2. Animals
  3. Vertebrates
  4. Mammals
  5. Primates
  6. Lemurs
  7. True lemurs
  8. Lemur
  9. Ring-tailed lemur

BBC News about Ring-tailed lemur

Video collections

Take a trip through the natural world with our themed collections of video clips from the natural history archive.

  • The wildlife of Life The wildlife of Life

    In autumn 2009, a major new series brought us life as we've never seen it before.

  • David Attenborough's Madagascar David Attenborough's Madagascar

    Like nowhere else on Earth, the mystery and magic of Madagascar leaves a vivid impression on all those who visit, and none more so than David Attenborough.

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