English oak tree in a field with a rainbow

English oak

English oaks are a symbol of great strength and endurance. These magnificent trees grow to well over 30 metres and can live for 1,000 years or more. Flowering begins in late spring, with the fruits (acorns) ripening in time for autumn. Acorns grow in clusters and are an important source of food for many birds and small mammals, particularly jays and squirrels who cache away the acorns for later consumption. Being deciduous, oaks lose their distinctive lobed and wavy leaves in winter. They have been a prized source of timber since prehistoric times and it's said that an oak tree hid king Charles II from the Roundheads at Boscobel.

Scientific name: Quercus robur

Rank: Species

Common names:

Pedunculate oak

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Distribution

The English oak can be found in a number of locations including: Europe, Russia, United Kingdom, Wales. Find out more about these places and what else lives there.

Habitats

The following habitats are found across the English oak distribution range. Find out more about these environments, what it takes to live there and what else inhabits them.

Behaviours

Discover what these behaviours are and how different plants and animals use them.

Additional data source: Animal Diversity Web

BBC News about English oak

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