Rear view of a monocled cobra showing marking on hood

Monocled cobra

Monocled cobras are famed for their magnificent hood, which sports circular markings that resemble eyes. They are timid and yet very dangerous snakes, with a powerful toxin that can prove fatal if not treated. What makes the monocled cobra especially dangerous is the way they repeatedly strike when excited - injecting more deadly venom. Their proximity to villages and cities accounts for the large number of people bitten each year. Reaching a modest two metres in length, monocled cobras prey on the rodents, amphibians and reptiles of Southeast Asia.

Scientific name: Naja kaouthia

Rank: Species

Common names:

Monocellate cobra

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Distribution

The Monocled cobra can be found in a number of locations including: Asia, China, Himalayas, Indian subcontinent. Find out more about these places and what else lives there.

Habitats

The following habitats are found across the Monocled cobra distribution range. Find out more about these environments, what it takes to live there and what else inhabits them.

Additional data source: Animal Diversity Web

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