Fallow deer stag with antlers (c) Mike Warburton

Fallow deer

Fallow deer are a widespread species of deer in Britain. Originally from the Mediterranean and middle east, these deer were spread across Europe by the Romans and introduced to British parks and forests by the Normans in the 11th century. They spend most of the year in single sex herds, only coming together in autumn for the annual rut, where the males groan, parallel walk and lock antlers. Luckily, injuries are rare although the males sport impressive multi-point antlers. Fallow deer are smaller than red deer and have a spotted coat, but in some individuals the spots are not very prominent and may disappear in winter.

Scientific name: Dama dama

Rank: Species

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Distribution

Map showing the distribution of the Fallow deer taxa

Species range provided by WWF's Wildfinder.

The Fallow deer can be found in a number of locations including: Asia, Europe, Mediterranean, Russia, United Kingdom, Wales. Find out more about these places and what else lives there.

Habitats

The following habitats are found across the Fallow deer distribution range. Find out more about these environments, what it takes to live there and what else inhabits them.

Additional data source: Animal Diversity Web

Conservation Status

Least Concern

  1. EX - Extinct
  2. EW
  3. CR - Threatened
  4. EN - Threatened
  5. VU - Threatened
  6. NT
  7. LC - Least concern

Population trend: Unknown

Year assessed: 2008

Classified by: IUCN 3.1

BBC News about Fallow deer

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