Robin looking towards camera (c) Nick Stacey

Robin

Robins are one of the only UK birds to be heard singing in the garden on Christmas day. This is because they hold their territories all year round, warning off intruders with song. Males may hold the same territory throughout their lives, and will even attack a bundle of red feathers or their own reflection if they mistake it for another individual.

Their melodious voices, along with their cheeky attitudes, have endeared robin red breasts to the British public, and in 1960 they were crowned the UK's national bird.

Did you know?
The characteristic image of a robin on a spade handle is a consequence of their territorial instinct. The male quite simply seeks a favourable lookout post!

Scientific name: Erithacus rubecula

Rank: Species

Common names:

European robin

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Distribution

Map showing the distribution of the Robin taxa

Species range provided by WWF's Wildfinder.

The Robin can be found in a number of locations including: Africa, Asia, Europe, Mediterranean, United Kingdom, Wales, Ynys-hir nature reserve. Find out more about these places and what else lives there.

Habitats

The following habitats are found across the Robin distribution range. Find out more about these environments, what it takes to live there and what else inhabits them.

Behaviours

Discover what these behaviours are and how different plants and animals use them.

Additional data source: Animal Diversity Web

Conservation Status

Least Concern

  1. EX - Extinct
  2. EW
  3. CR - Threatened
  4. EN - Threatened
  5. VU - Threatened
  6. NT
  7. LC - Least concern

Year assessed: 2009

Classified by: IUCN 3.1

Sounds

BBC News about Robin

Video collections

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