Crowned lemur sitting on a branch

Crowned lemur

The only place crowned lemurs can be found is in the dry forests of northern Madagascar where they use their long tails to balance as they leap around the canopy. These small lemurs are about the size of a house cat and live in close-knit social groups of 5 or 6 individuals. The young are born as the rainy season starts, so they can make the most of the plentiful flowers, fruits and leaves they like to eat. At first, the youngsters are carried clinging to their mother's belly, but as they get bigger and heavier, they move round to ride on her back.

Scientific name: Eulemur coronatus

Rank: Species

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Distribution

The Crowned lemur can be found in a number of locations including: Madagascar. Find out more about these places and what else lives there.

Habitats

The following habitats are found across the Crowned lemur distribution range. Find out more about these environments, what it takes to live there and what else inhabits them.

Tropical dry forest Tropical dry forest
Tropical dry forests, in contrast to rainforest, have to survive a long dry season each year, so the predominantly deciduous trees shed their leaves to cope with it. Sunlight can then reach the ground, so the season that's bad for the trees is good for the forest floor.

Additional data source: Animal Diversity Web

Conservation Status

Vulnerable

  1. EX - Extinct
  2. EW
  3. CR - Threatened
  4. EN - Threatened
  5. VU - Threatened
  6. NT
  7. LC - Least concern

Population trend: Decreasing

Year assessed: 2008

Classified by: IUCN 3.1

Video collections

Take a trip through the natural world with our themed collections of video clips from the natural history archive.

  • David Attenborough's Madagascar David Attenborough's Madagascar

    Like nowhere else on Earth, the mystery and magic of Madagascar leaves a vivid impression on all those who visit, and none more so than David Attenborough.

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