Bactrian camel walking in the desert

Bactrian camel

Bactrian camels are well equipped with two humps, both of which store large amounts of fat to see them through lean times. They inhabit arid regions and are found along rivers in Siberia during winter, dispersing into the desert when the snow melts in spring. They prefer a diet of plants, but when such nutrient sources are not available these highly adaptable animals will feed on bones, and in extreme conditions may eat rope, sandals and even tents!

Scientific name: Camelus bactrianus

Rank: Species

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Distribution

Map showing the distribution of the Bactrian camel taxa

Species range provided by WWF's Wildfinder.

The Bactrian camel can be found in a number of locations including: Asia, China. Find out more about these places and what else lives there.

Habitats

The following habitats are found across the Bactrian camel distribution range. Find out more about these environments, what it takes to live there and what else inhabits them.

Desert Desert
Desert and dry scrubland describes any area that receives less than 250mm of rainfall a year. Not just the endless, baking sand dunes of popular conception, it includes arid areas in temperate regions.

Additional data source: Animal Diversity Web

Conservation Status

Critically Endangered

  1. EX - Extinct
  2. EW
  3. CR - Threatened
  4. EN - Threatened
  5. VU - Threatened
  6. NT
  7. LC - Least concern

BBC News about Bactrian camel

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