Gilles Peterson Brazilika Review

Compilation. Released 2009.  

BBC Review

This is a fine place to start

Jon Lusk 2009

Whew! Ready for another Brazilian compilation? 15 years after his excellent Talkin' Loud selection of the same name – and following those by Kenny Dope, 4Hero and Andy Votel – DJ Gilles Peterson is let loose on the UK's Far Out catalogue. Predictably, it's a generally well-sequenced affair, and will serve as a good introduction to their wares, though it has little new to offer hardcore Brazilophiles.

The subtitle 'Explorations Deep Inside the Vaults' is a bit misleading, since all but 5 of the 23 cuts here have been previously released on said label, and those which haven't are all by artists on their roster. Thankfully, Peterson has segued the tracks into one another, but not remixed them.

There's a nice example of his DJ skills near the end of the compilation, at the close of Memories (Jose Carretas feat. Zeep), when Nina Miranda's scat vocals merge into those of Joyce on an obscure mix of her Feijao Com Arroz – one of the previously unreleased tracks. This second half of the compilation is more dancefloor-orientated than the first, but there's a rather jarring sequence bridging them, when Azymuth's bustling Melo Dos Dois Bicudos gives way to the proggy, clouting jazz rock of Binario.

It's a bit of a shock after the cruisy opening sequence, which flows through a wonderfully kaleidoscopic juxtaposition of classic tracks by Azymuth, Friends From Rio, Krishnanda, The Ipanemas, Grupo Batuque et al. Berimbaus twang, Portuguese spoken word interludes drift by, horn sections slouch about and samba bands tweak their cuicas and blast away on police whistles.

Of the previously unreleased material, Mark Robertson's remix of Azymuth’s Depois Do Carnival is perhaps the most interesting, and with three tracks, (plus one by their bass player Alex Malheiros and his daughter Sabrina) they seem to be label faves. It's not hard to see why. For those new to the label, this is a fine place to start.

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