Stereophonics Language. Sex. Violence. Other? Review

Album. Released 2005.  

BBC Review

Renewed energy and positive affirmation run throughout 'Language. Sex. Violence. Other?'

Niky Daley 2003

For Feeder fans who think the group have gone soft, hope lies in the Stereophonics' new album Language. Sex. Violence. Other? As frontman and writer Kelly Jones has himself said, this album is "rockier and in your face" compared to You Gotta Go There To Come Back, but a fair bit has happened since then. The biggest change being that founder member and drummer Stuart Cable was unceremoniously dumped, replaced on tour by Steve Gorman (ex-Black Crowes) with Javier Weyler becoming the more permanent fixture. The Argentinian drummer was no stranger to the band, being, amongst other things, a second tour engineer.

Despite (or maybe due to) all this upheaval, Kelly's voice has found a new confidence. Its gravely texture is still there but has been overtaken by a much louder and stronger sound. Just like the "Doorman" of the second track, this album has bucket loads of attitude with stomping drums and hardcore guitars, and the swaggering really starts to get going on the next track, "Brother".

Current single "Dakota" leapt to the top of the charts and is definitely the catchiest song with real mainstream appeal. "Rewind" comes a close second with a building melody and U2-style strumming.

Renewed energy and positive affirmation run throughout Language. Sex. Violence. Other? Even if it isn't to everyone's taste, it is much better than the band's previousrecords that were panned by critics for their insipidness and mediocrity. As "Rewind" states, 'change is ok, what is the point of staying the same'. Apparently, if we don't like it we can suck Kelly'sbanana, 'suck it with cream.' Charming.

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