22-20s 22-20s Review

Album. Released 2004.  

BBC Review

Thankfully the 22-20s ability to marry gritty rock 'n' roll with classic blues has not...

Damian Jones 2004

The 22-20s have been kicking about the live circuit for a few years now. The Lincoln blues quartet have been catching the eyes and ears of record bosses and music hacks up and down the country. Indeed the gutsy teenagers even took the bold step of releasing a live mini-album, 05/03 before their first studio record saw the light of day.

Thankfully the 22-20s ability to marry gritty rock 'n' roll with classic blues has not been lost in transition from gig to record on this triumphant self-titled debut. The same bludgeoning sound that made the band come alive on stage is ever present throughout. With the help of Primal Scream producer Brendan Lynch, the 22-20s have thrown together 10 dark and thunderous songs about love, demons, lust and sexual frustration.

The angry stomp of "Why Don't You Do It For Me?" tells the story of an insecure man left out in the cold by his lover. Singer Martin Trimble emphasises this point brilliantly with the sharp snarling vocals: "You look so good in a photograph but you never dress up for me...I'm your man why don't you do it for me?". Rumbling opener "Devil In Me" oozes the same angry intensity. Only this time Trimble's biting vocals are vented at the voice of temptation against a backdrop of scratchy riffs and pounding drum-rolls.

The talented quartet mix it up with campfire ballad "Friends", turning back the clock to the band's early blues roots when they first hit the road. Unfortunately their ability to slow things down falls by the wayside on the dreary "The Things That Lovers Do".

Thankfully the 22-20s for the most part stick to what they do best, playing intense rock n roll songs like the upbeat "I'm The One" and psychedelic chart hit "Shoot Your Gun".

The band's three year transformation from blues breaking hopefuls to coming of age rock 'n' roll stars has been a long one.But boy it's been worth it.

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