DT8 Project Perfect World Review

Album. Released 2007.  

BBC Review

Imagine an underwater roller coaster going at half speed and you’re about there. A...

Rob Crossan 2007

Darren Tate is one of the most successful dance music producers of all time, so why it’s taken him this long to release such a magnum opus is open to question. The years spent honing his craft working with seemingly everyone that comes within a bus route of dance music from Judge Jules to Charlotte Church has clearly paid dividends, however, as this is an ambitious, dynamic, sweeping, slightly woozy but above all supremely confident splicing of electronica, four-to-the-floor house and accessible trance.

Familiar voices drift in and out of the ambience including Gavin Rossdale from veteran grungesters Bush and Andrea Britton. “Reflection” is a glorious piece of tribal house that harks back to the very best of BT’s work on Ima in the mid-‘90s. The undoubted highlight however is the contribution from Mory Kante, the Guinean vocalist responsible for “Yeke Yeke”, one of the biggest selling African tunes of all time. He makes “Narama” on this album an infectious looping slice of constantly building euphoric house. It always veers off to a tangent just when you think the blistering build up can’t possibly get any tighter without breaking free from the speakers and going feral around your living room: Addictive and hugely enjoyable.

The only criticism is that, at times, this collection gets a little too slick with some tracks washing over you in an innocuous kind of ‘H&M-fitting-room-chill-out-muzak’ way. “Succumb To The Night” is forgettable, but the point with Tate’s vision here is not to pinpoint specific tracks but rather approach this record in the most tactile manner possible. Tate has created an intensely warm, interesting album full of quirks and interesting discoveries buried deep in the mix that demand repeated listening. Imagine an underwater roller coaster going at half speed and you’re about there. A triumph.

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