Slovo Todo Cambia Review

Released 2007.  

BBC Review

Todo Cambia is one of the most worthy records you'll ever hear.

Daryl Easlea 2007

Todo Cambia is the second album by South London outfit, Slovo. Built around sometime Faithless guitarist Dave Randall, it's a real collaborative effort like his parent band's early work, with a core of vocalist Andrea Britton and rapper Bobby Whiskers complimenting his multi-instrumental skills.

Obviously, it is unsurprising that swathes of the album resemble his old group (minus the more extreme house edges). There is a sprightly, somewhat stoned swagger to a lot of the material. ''Spun Out'' is a great example of what they do. A nervy drum and bass with Randall's laconic vocal complimented with the fresh, zesty vocals and raps of Britton. There are powerful guest vocals from Arundhati Roy on her poem set to music, ''Flags'' ('Bits of coloured cloth that governments first use to shrink wrap people's brains and then as ceremonial shrouds to bury the dead.') George Jackson pops up as well on ''Soledad Brother''.

Todo Cambia is one of the most worthy records you'll ever hear. Everything is loaded with meaning; there is not a great room for play. And as such, it's a fabulous example of politicized pop. At its peaks, it has ferocious, snarling teeth, fully utilizing the mid-paced trip hop, chilling atmospherics; it's all here. In its valleys, some of its beats and raps are a trifle generic, and its occasionally hectoring nature gives the feeling of being battered rhythmically over the head with the Socialist Worker.

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