Ween La Cucaracha Review

Released 2007.  

BBC Review

My suspicion is that there aren’t too many Ween fans in the UK. This album won't be...

James Young 2007

Ween are an enigma. How they have maintained a career that has stretched over 11 albums and nearly 20 years is a mystery. As more than one reviewer has pointed out, there is little point in reviewing a Ween record as their fan base will undoubtedly buy the album anyway, and everyone else will ignore it. Here, once again, they stick faithfully to the formula that has pleased them and their fans - arch musicianship, a perfect ear for the musical pastiche, and ludicrous lyrics that are frequently offensive.

Prime example is "My Own Bare Hands": A pitch perfect facsimile of heavy rock whose deft turns of phrase cover a litany of swearing and sexist rubbish that is both puerile and wearing. Irony is used as cover to say 'f**k' on record… for the 11th Album in a row. Surely, Ween fan, the joke must wear thin? And do we need anyone to point out that rock is a misogynistic genre? Similarly "Object" contains the plain nasty 'You’re just a piece of meat and I’m the butcher'.

You are left to guess what game Ween fans play with every release that comes out. What or who are they parodying this time, how perfect is it, and how hilariously dumb are the lyrics? You’re also left feeling that that without the ridiculous lyrics their music would be technically proficient, unoriginal, and deeply soulless.

For the record I can’t place "Blue Balloon", but it’s a mellow surrealistic groove, perhaps a bit Bowie or Beck, it bears repeated listens, and if you are looking for bulls eye deconstructions of prog rock then "Spirit Walker" and the 10-minute "Woman and Man" are worth a listen. Other genres firmly nailed are country, in the passingly enjoyable "Learnin' To Love", Euro house, in the execrable "Friends", and reggae, badly, in "The Fruit Man".

My suspicion is that there aren’t too many Ween fans in the UK. This album won't be making many more...

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