Efterklang Under Giant Trees Review

Album. Released 2007.  

BBC Review

At its best, 'Under Giant Trees' wields an impressive emotional weight that’s likely...

Colin Buttimer 2007

Danish 5-piece Efterklang celebrated its sixth year in January and close on the heels of that anniversary, they’ve released this 5 track, 30 minute EP. Under Giant Trees is the successor to Springer, another EP, and their debut album, Tripper. If you’re not already familiar with the group and are impatient for some quick signposts to orient yourself, Efterklang’s explores similar electro-acoustic territories as that of Mùm, Colleen or Sigur Ros.

Opener, ''Falling Horses'', is brimful of yearning and wears its wearily passionate heart on its sleeve with pride. Its male/female vocals whisper and roar at times in unison, at times distinct, but entwined like snaking vines. Himmelbjerget continues seamlessly as melancholic trumpet and violin float to the surface of the keening ensemble sound. ''Hands Playing Butterfly'' begins reedily, like the musical evocation of a yellowed family photograph. It tiptoes gently to its close on dainty piano notes wreathed with plaintive strings like a Tindersticks instrumental. The mixture of dancing clockwork electronica and acoustic snap that drives ''Towards The Bare Hill'' along conjures thoughts of The Brothers Quay’s most intricate animations.

Fans should note that the group’s website promises none of the music on this EP will appear on their next album. It’s a limited edition release and comes clothed in an exquisite digipak, its imagery a mixture of vivid colours, schematic houses and denuded winter trees. At its best, Under Giant Trees wields an impressive emotional weight that’s likely to carry the listener far out to sea like an unexpected riptide.

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