SixNationState SixNationState Review

Album. Released 2007.  

BBC Review

The singing is magnificent, and if they could find their own voice to match it they...

James Young 2007

Six Nation State swapped the mean streets of Southampton for the dazzling lights of Reading and having torn up the local scene were snapped up by Jeepster, home of gravel-throated rockers The Stereophonics. Judging by his powerful boom SNS lead singer Gerry has a chest as cavernous as The Roundhouse and it is used to good effect as he whoops, hollers, shouts, growls, and woahs through this debut outing.

Their gigs are, by all accounts, hyperactive affairs and they bring this to this pacey, punky album; but they may wear their influences a little too heavily. They themselves make the comparison with The Coral and it is most evident in the summery upbeat shimmy of “Caught The Sun”. Elsewhere, the triumphant bump of “Where Are You Now?” would please fans of The Fratellis. More interesting is the Gomez-produced-by-Portishead sound of “I Hate The Summer”; the high tempo, ska punk of “Taking Me Over” and gangster-themed, trumpet-touting “Up And Down”.

At times in “We Could Be Happy” and “Can’t Let Go” you can hear a melancholy joy reminiscent of The Smiths. Unfortunately the similarity ends there as a paucity of lyrical wit runs through the album. But you may have already sussed this from the mundane song titles. If not, it is horribly exposed in the bland “Don’t Need You Anymore” where lyrics such as ‘…and try to see me and see how I feel, coz all of the feelings I felt them for real, coz I was so happy and you were so sad’ contain rhyming couplets to make Noel Gallagher blush.

Overall it is a energetic romp but the lack of invention means the album doesn’t necessarily improve with repeated listens, and the overtly magpie approach makes you feel the band have yet to really settle on their own sound. Yet throughout Gerry’s singing is magnificent, and if they could find their own voice to match it they would be ones to watch out for.

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