Sajid-Wajid Teri Meri Kahaani Review

Soundtrack. Released 2012.  

BBC Review

A crowd pleaser featuring the cream of the industry’s playback singers.

Jaspreet Pandohar 2012

Tezz aside, Sajid and Wajid Ali have been on a winning streak lately, composing popular soundtracks for Bollywood blockbusters such as Dabangg, Housefull 2 and Rowdy Rathore. With Teri Meri Kahaani the duo prove they have their fingers on the pulse when it comes to creating music appreciated by the masala-loving masses.

Teri Meri Kahaani is a commercial rom-com set in three different eras. So it’s fitting that the five original songs here, alongside two remixes by DJ Suketu, offer up distinct sounds and tones, each suited to the period they represent.

Allah Jaane and Humse Pyar Kar Le Tu are full of passion and poetry and belong to the early 19th century. In the former, Rahat Fateh Ali Khan’s rich vocals, paired with traditional instruments such as the sarangi and harmonium, conjures a sound that transports the listener back to pre-independence India. Mika shines in the second of these two songs. His charismatic, flirty persona is perfect opposite Shreya Ghoshal, who stands her own in this male-verses-female duel.

Jumping forwards to the swinging 60s and you get Jabse Mere Dil Ko Uff, a friendly tribute to the Shammi Kapoor and RD Burman days when Hindi film music had oomph and displayed the first signs of Western influence. Crooner Sonu Nigam and songstress Sunidhi Chauhan are the ideal choice for this rock’n’roll number whose catchy hook is accompanied by plenty of drums, guitar and blaring trumpets.

Strangely, nearing the present day, the Ali brothers begin to lose their originality. Mukhtasar boasts a high tempo and obvious dance beats, while That’s All I Really Wanna Do feels a tad childish with its nursery rhyme-style lyrics.

Although steering on the conventional side, Teri Meri Kahaani doesn’t compromise on quality. It’s an entertaining crowd pleaser of an album featuring the cream of the industry’s playback singers.

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