The Youngsters Lemonorange Review

BBC Review

...ownership and knowledge of this album will certainly make you cooler than most of...

Christian Hopwood 2002

Hailing from Montpellier the dynamic, electronic (no, they're not battery operated) duo The Youngsters consist of Gil le Gamin and Olivier M; Mr Gamin a DJ, record shop owner and founder of the G-Funk label and Olivier a passionate music composer. As a band, perhaps they hold the world record for the shortest 'how we came to be' story which goes something like...Olivier took a demo tape in to Gil's shop and er...a fortnight later they were working together. That was way back when at the beginning of 1999. Fast forward to the end of 2001 and the delivery of the tangy, citrus zest of Lemonorange.

Motivated by a solo maxim, 'Make people dance', The Youngsters have composed an album full of authority and affection for anything that might fall into the arena of techno. Whilst the sounds on this record are familiar, it's unlikely you've heard them combined with such understanding and aplomb. "Slow" sets in motion some gritty, rolling techno and, complement of all complements, might best be described as the missing track from Daft Punk's Homework.

Chunky, deep piano grooves on the excellent "Choose" nestle comfortably along side the rougher, more acidic cuts such as "Friperie Connection" and "Abusive Melody" in a album inspired by a love of the music from Detroit. That said, this record manages to free the handcuffs, undo the chains and shake off the straight jacket of territorial definition - sometimes it sounds American, at others French yet "Illogique" takes its cue from Scottish duo Slam's "Lifetimes".

With the likes of Laurent Garnier, Alex Kid and Aqua Bassino, the F Comm stable is rearing nothing but pedigree acts at present. Lemonorange is shaping up to be one of the years best kept secrets and ownership and knowledge of this album will certainly make you cooler than most of your friends. Do not be afraid to go out on a limb...That's where the fruit is.

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