Biffy Clyro Infinity Land Review

Album. Released 2004.  

BBC Review

The genius of Infinity Land is the band's ability to lace sweet sounding melodies with...

Damian Jones 2004

Scottish three-piece Biffy Clyro certainly don't hang about when it comes to bashing out new records. Unlike most bands who release an album perhaps once every two to three years, these hard sloggers completely break the mould by releasing an LP every 12 months. The amazing thing is that Infinity Land, their third record, sounds so complex at times that you'd have thought it would have taken them years to complete.

The album, which was produced by the band and with the help of Foo Fighters and Feeder producer Chris Sheldon, is crammed with 13 sprawling songs that are a testament to the Scottish trio's work rate.

The genius of Infinity Land is the band's ability to lace sweet sounding melodies with brutal guitar riffs, heavy drum-rolls and unpredictable stop start arrangements.

The aptly titled opening track 'Glitter And Trauma' is a fine example of this, kicking off with a series of scratchy dance beats before bursting into meaty guitar hooks set against singer Simon Neil's gentle vocals. At times he almost sounds like Queens Of The Stone Age frontman Josh Homme.

But any further comparison ends there. From here on in Neil's vocals switch from harmonious ('The Atrocity') to full on screeching ('Strung To Your Ribcage'). Despite the former track's gentle approach, the words are extremely desolate as the haunting lyrics: 'I don't wanna die. Don't expect me to die', clearly reinforce. This is mirrored in the traumatic 'Wave Upon Wave' where Neil talks about a knife in his hand covered in blood.

Nearly every song is unpredictable. Even the album's heaviest number 'Theres No Such Thing As A Jaggy Snake' completely trips you up with its melodic twists.

As a result Biffy Clyro can only be applauded for pushing the boundaries so brilliantly. Infinity Land is without doubt the band's finest material to date.

Creative Commons Licence This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Licence. If you choose to use this review on your site please link back to this page.