Rod Taylor Shining Bright Review

Released 2003.  

BBC Review

Wicked stuff ! RodTaylor's heartfelt ode to 'Muvvers' is followed by the heavy & horn...

Sister Alison 2002

So the Mighty Jah warrior label brings us a work by the Rootsman himself Rod Taylor. The man responsible for some of the most awesome Roots tunes ever to be heard out of a sound system! Who hasn't been shaken with the word sound power of his classic "Ethiopian Kings" coming at you with more bass and decibels than can be humanly good for us!

Now resident for many years in France, he is still in fine vocal form and tours regularly with his group, The Artikal crew. This album is produced by Steve Mosco, so you can rely on getting music played on real instruments. It was recorded at Dougie Wardrops' Conscious sounds studios with the usual input from the Crispy horns, Jonah Dan, Hughi Izachaar and Steve Mosco himself.

The opening title track is a mid tempoed bongo filled ode to Jah, followed by the slow driving "Weeping and Wailing" with Rod informing us "Babylon throne gone down". Wicked stuff ! His heartfelt ode to 'Muvvers' is followed by the heavy & horn fuelled "Be with JAH". Lovely.

"JAH Bless" allows Mr Izachaar to step up on the melodica credentials. A really stand out tune with Rod displaying his vocals in fine style. "Stop the War" is more than relevant in this time, "Everyday a pure war for nothing at all".

"Jah Warriors" steps the mood down a pace or two with lovely guitar and organ touches. Another Steppers, Melodica fused work, "Rasta" is lovely, allowing Mr Taylor to exercise the old tonsils and sing like a youth still!

"Mr Policemen" brings a story that will get those who remember suffering under the old SUS laws nodding their heads. The final work "Psalms" is another stand out cut, heavy roots at its best, with haunting flute accompaniment courtesy of Richard Doswell.

At the forefront of the UK Roots scene for many years, Steve Mosco has continued innovating and carrying the UK scene forward. He has always avoided the clichés that many UK producers of Roots music seemed to fall into, like sticking with formulaic Steppers and Dub, dub, dub.

But this album is definitely worthy of adding to your collection. Another good work from Jah Warrior. Check it!

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