Po' Girl Home To You Review

Released 2007.  

BBC Review

...Put together, their effortless harmonies retain a dreamy quality which makes you...

Sue Keogh 2007

A follow-up to Po’Girls’s 2004 debut Vagabond Lullabies is most welcome. It had had the whiff of a one-off project about it, what with the two original collaborators - Alison Russell and Trish Klein – being known more for their other bands, Fear Of Drinking and quirky roots outfit, Be Good Tanyas.


But what started out as a few duo performances while they were sharing a house in East Vancouver now sees Po’Girl expanded to a five-piece who tour the world’s folk festivals, and release their music through Canadian label Nettwerk, who generally look after more mainstream artists like Avril Lavigne, Sarah McLachlan and Barenaked Ladies.


Home To You sees them further defining their gentle acoustic sound, offering a similarly bright and breezy yet intimate and charming atmosphere to any Tanyas, She-Haw or Erin McKeown album. There’s the expected acoustic mix of guitars, banjos and violin, plus a couple of moments of clarinet and trumpet or wry comments from performance poet CV Avery to keep you on your toes. Where Russell’s voice is rich and bluesy, Klein and band members Diona Davies and Awna Texiera offer a more smooth and drowsy tone; put together, their effortless harmonies retain a dreamy quality which makes you wonder if their thoughts are really on other things.


It’s not hard to see where this focus could lie. A quick glance through the titles – “Skies Of Grey”, “Home To You”, “Green Apples”, “9 Hours To Go”, “Drive All Night” – and snatches of lyrics about winding roads, clocks ticking, bee pollen or the sweet southern sun, and a wistful preoccupation with the natural world is quickly revealed; one which is continually quashed by the urgent need to gather everything up and leave for the bright lights of the next city without so much as a goodbye. Well, that’s the price of success isn’t it – and it’s only going to get worse…

Creative Commons Licence This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Licence. If you choose to use this review on your site please link back to this page.