Moneyspinner Poetry Review

Released 2009.  

BBC Review

Guaranteed to get the most reluctant feet moving.

Jerome Blakeney 2009

Two years after the successful Ladies & Gentlemen album, Moneyspinner return with a slice of Bhangra that's as classy as the tuxedos they sport on the rear of the CD cover.

As their MySpace page attests, the intervening years putting poetry together haven't been wasted. It seems they've been on a worldwide shopping trip to find the best vocalists to put the icing on this very danceable feast. Kicking off with Jaspinder Narula on the irresistible Meh Kalli Socha Kee may seem like a high standard to maintain; but maintain it they do.

This is the reason they succeed so well: by mixing unstoppable folk beats with singers of an incredibly high calibre. For example, if there's anyone who can handle a duet it's Miss Pooja who's teamed up here with Meet Malkit on the uplifting Khera Shad. But the real star of the show is the man who takes most of the vocal duties, Ballwinder Matewaria. On Poetry he's allowed to vary his style effortlessly between the soaring, ecstatic Vicherian Deh Meleh, the harder edged, gunfire toting Putt Jattan Deh Maardeh Barka or even the syllable spitting delights of Moneyspinner Tappe with its bursts of double-quick dhol.
He even turns his talents to the album's one Qawwali track, Mubarak Mubarak which echoes a similar trend on Sukshinder Shinda's last mighty release.

While a couple of the tracks are clearly designed for the party dance floor, clocking in at well over six minutes the beats never get stale, and the massed choruses push the Punjab vibe to the max. Wrapping up with the Nirmal Sidhu led ode Desh Panjab Di is the final masterstroke. Poetry may only have eight tracks but they're guaranteed to get the most reluctant feet moving.

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