British Sea Power Remember Me Review

Single. Released 3 December 2001.  

BBC Review

Nostalgia is big these days and Rough Trade are certainly in the nostalgia business at...

Olli Siebelt 2002

On a roll following their recent high profile successes with both The Strokes and Moldy Peaches, come indie überlabel Rough Trade's latest offering (not from New York this time but dear old Brighton), British Sea Power.

A four piece who have been around for about year and a half now, BSP had a self-released EP out earlier this year called "Fear Of Drowning". Now, having caught the beady eyes of Rough Trade A&R, this is their debut for the label - a fun, nostalgic three track EP that offers up an interesting take on a sound that was quite popular a few years ago.

Remember Me could sit right between a set from The Wedding Present or The Young Fresh Fellows. The title track is more reminiscent of the Cult or The Mission, though updated to give just enough of an edge not to be considered derivative or dare I say, too goth. "A Lovely Day Tomorrow" completely switches gears and heads off in a direction that almost exactly parallels what was happening in early 90's New Zealand; I could have been easily fooled into believing this was the Bats or JPS Experience if I didn't know better. The EP closes with "Birdy", a lovely instrumental full of washed out guitars that sounds not so much like 60's psychedelia but more like an unreleased Ride instrumental circa "Decay". None of this is at all bad, mind you; it's just been done a million times before.

Nostalgia is big these days and Rough Trade are certainly in the nostalgia business at the moment. Whether they are consciously cashing in or stuck in the past, I'm not sure (I'd be curious to see what the ages of their A&R folk are). British Sea Power are by all means a good and capable band, (they would have been huge in the mid 90's supporting Ride or Ned's Atomic Dustbin), however with a sound this obvious, it still makes me wonder if their ship can weather the stormy music seas into 2002 or if the wave of nostalgia will simply drown them in an already crowded musical ocean.

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