Big Brovaz Re-Entry Review

Released 2007.  

BBC Review

Like Marmite, you either love or hate, the South London collective...

Maxine Headley 2007

Like Marmite, you either love or hate, the South London collective Big Brovaz. Yes, they did produce a wacky theatrical style on their debut album Nu Flow, which won them fans, and comparisons to Outkast, but those who didn’t get it, simply saw them as a poor man’s Fugees.

Nevertheless, after that platinum-selling effort and two members gone - Dion (to pursue a song writing career) and Flawless (who ironically turned out not to be so, erm, flawless, by getting caught taking weed into the States), the reformed Big Brovaz return with their sophomore album Re-Entry to stir up more controversy.

And what better way to start other than to enter 2007’s Eurovision Song Contest? ''Big Bro Thang'', the first single to officially be taken from their album, has a touch of the Evanescence and continues their familiar mashed up sounds of hip-hop, pop, rock and R&B. However they've obviously not learned Daz Sampson’s lesson that rapping doesn't go down too well in this type of show. It's most unlikely that this track will make much of an impact on the Euro trash.

And yet, despite being associated with such cheesiness, Cherise, J-Rock, Nadia and Randy still have the rest of the album to try and impress.

They successfully revive the 90’s New Jack Swing flava on ''Can’t Hold Me Down'' and ''Hangin’ Around'', which samples The Carpenters’ ''Rainy Days And Mondays'' to convey a positive message. ''You & I'' is a surprising highlight that allows each individual member to shine. It’s actually a love song that's both beautiful and soulful. Unfortunately, the disaster of ''Hey Hey Take U Home'' only draws your attention to the guys' faux pas of putting on American accents. Because of this, there are times that you wish that the girls were left to sing their hearts out while their male counterparts took a back seat.

Such a mixed bag means that Big Brovaz remain an acquired taste...

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