Zombie Nation Zombielicious Review

Album. Released 2009.  

BBC Review

Zombielicious marks a career peak which dazzles and grinds in equally exciting measure.

Rob Crossan 2009

The more aggressive end of the German dance music spectrum has never pandered to the dilettante. But there's a surprising amount to enjoy on Zombilicious for the warehouse party veteran and the newcomer to the belligerent hedonism of Munich-based Florian Senfter. He's marked 2009 as the anniversary of his first decade as a DJ and producer, to use Zombie Nation as a distillation of his trademark filthy bassline hooks and pounding synths.

The ride is, as you would expect, a fast and relentless. The slick production does a concise job at creating brevity in some of the tracks that you would suspect might sag slightly anywhere outside of a strobe lit festival tent.

There's a head bludgeoning simplicity to Senfter's methods which, in less capable hands, could result in nothing more than mindless acid fuel. In tracks like Sea Of Grease however, the full mastery of his deceptive way with beats is gloriously realised: a sparing yet roaring floor filler that sounds like 50 feet of scaffolding slowly tumbling onto the factory floor.

The final track, Bass Kaput is another stand out. Clanging industrial spookiness abounds to create a feeling akin to being on a rapidly disintegrating spaceship idly spiralling towards destinations unwelcoming and unknown.

It's hard to find fault with the seamlessness of this record. With Daft Punk on an extended hiatus and with the echo of Kraftwerk always in his music's vicinity, Senfter's sound is needed more than ever at this time. After a decade of making such a seductive racket, Zombielicious marks a career peak which dazzles and grinds in equally exciting measure.

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