Kotchy 89 Review

Album. Released 2009.  

BBC Review

Sexy 21st century pseudo-R 'n' B that’s been sealed with a fizz.

Paul Clarke 2009

In Kotchy's world, the soundtrack to seduction isn't soft jazz or Barry White, but the buzzes and glitches of a laptop. For his debut album is like Prince's Parade for an era in which love is delivered via digital flowers to your Facebook page rather than real roses to your door; and Second Life lets any skinny suburban kid pretend to be an exotic lothario.

A twentysomething from Indianapolis now based in Brooklyn, Chad Curlow has already reinvented himself a few times throughout his career thus far, both drumming in electronic art-rock band The Epochs and working as an underground hip hop producer. But it's in his solo guise as Kotchy that he's carved the most unique niche for himself; that of Justin Timberlake's nerdy brother with a bag of Warp records and some heavy relationship issues. However, he also has both the production skills and imagination to make that seemingly unlikely recipe work, and a honeyed voice which still sounds as if he's whimpering with loneliness even when yelping, ''let's dance butt naked'' on She Made It Easy.

The first single from the album, She Made It Easy first really alerted the world to Kotchy in September 2008 following his remixes for Tricky and Yo! Majesty, and contains some glimpses of the elements he's now expanded upon for 89. There are the clipped Timbaland-style beats also heard in Sing What You Want, while Check Out My Keychain cuts up a dub bassline with electronic bleeps and Kotchy's imploring vocals, and One For The Money smothers slowed-down hip-hop samples in a warm electronic blanket. But even though Kotchy has obviously been as inspired by esoteric Scandinavian electronica subgenre, skwee, as he has by the universal soul giants, he's still created an album that you could wrap yourself in either with your lover or after you've just been dumped: sexy 21st century pseudo-R 'n' B that’s been sealed with a fizz.

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