Ghosts The World Is Outside Review

Album. Released 2007.  

BBC Review

Tune-friendly pop-rock from these Londoners. Hotly-tipped by BBC News!

Al Fox 2007

You’ve got to give credit to bands who set out to make a feel-good album. The rock/indie market seems to dictate that reflective misery is a pre-requisite if you have a guitar, and while that’s all well and good, bands that choose to communicate sunshine in their music rather than sober, shoe-gazing grief are often frowned upon. Hell, anyone remember the Toploader bloodbath?


Therefore, recognition must go to Ghosts, a band who are taking the aforementioned risk with debut album The World Is Outside. And while Ghosts aren’t necessarily producing shiny happy plasti-pop with round-the-clock smiles (and certainly aren’t Toploader), the singles unleashed so far already underline their novel avoidance of minor keys and misery - a sentiment sustained through the rest of their material.


One of The World Is Outside’s key pleasures comes via its numerous nods to music past and outside-the-box pseudo-samples. Whether it’s channelling the golden era of Britpop in the Bluetones-esque bliss of ‘’Stay The Night’’, the big-haired synth riff of the title track, or ‘’Stop’’’s breakneck bass thump, they each convey their own persona, all the while being swathed in a crisp, modern vibe.


Perhaps, in doing so, they’re not forging any new genres or restructuring the proverbial drawing board, but there’s nevertheless a freshness in The World Is Outside that gives it a charm all of its own.


And yet, the Ghosts are certainly capable of more than just the one trick. Slower, calmer numbers are a scarcity, but the few appearances are hugely successful, in particular the smooth ‘’Something Hilarious’’, and the comparatively subdued closing track, ‘’Temporary’’, which functions as an effective wind-down from its exhilarating forerunners.


Quite plainly, it’s the uncomplicated great music that makes The World Is Outside such a gratifying listen: A selection of towering, triumphant anthems with instantaneous melodies and unapologetic pop sensibilities. And the fact that this is achieved with no less musicianship or dexterity than their more morose contemporaries means it’s exactly the type of thing that’ll have pigeonhole purists seething. All the more reason to love it.

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