Daby Touré Call My Name Review

Album. Released 2009.  

BBC Review

Call My Name is a fantastic achievement.

Johnny Lais 2009

Call my name is not an album of roots discovery that one might expect to emerge from the union of American Blues and West African musical styles. Instead the musical offering is extraordinarily progressive, astute and refreshing. If anything this album demonstrates both genres moving full circle, complimenting each other with authoritative clarity.

Touré's vocals add a rich depth and emotion that will no doubt resonate with the traditionalist world music audience whilst embracing influences that are distinctly western. Therein lies the importance of this album, the recognition that African musicians are not frozen in time. The evolution is prevalent on Lost Voices and Past Time; two of the strongest tracks on the album.

The musical interplay of both artists is what truly stands out. Skip McDonald's harder, weightier style both vocally and instrumentally adds a resonance to the vibrant lighter style of Touré. Whilst neither has sacrificed anything stylistically the album feels as though it leans vocally towards Touré. The beautifully haunting Time Has Come leaves the listener wanting to hear more McDonald vocals.

Although Touré's bi-lingual vocals give the album a distinctive West African accent it would be unfair to define it merely as world music. McDonald's solid strength adds gravity with his bluesy influence.

Overall, Call My Name is a fantastic achievement, the relative nature of both musicians styles is so subtly delivered that at points the lines that separate them are dissolved. A new and interesting sound emerges from the collaborative efforts of Touré and McDonald that leaves the listener wanting more than the six tracks on the album.

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