Various Artists Dimitri From Paris - Return To The Playboy Mansion Review

Released 2008.  

BBC Review

There are some fantastic records here.

Louis Pattison 2008

The sequel to Dimitri's 2000 album, A Night At The Playboy Mansion, suggests, quite literally, that there are two sides to this Parisian playboy DJ – the 'Party' side, and the 'Sexy' side. Don't call him shallow, though: these two discs – the first concentrating on upbeat grooves, lush disco and jazz-funk, the second a more sensual, downtempo collection – suggest Dimitri has developed quite a skill for pushing his listener's buttons.

The first disc, 'Party', starts with a shock, in the shape of Jamiroquai's Cosmic Girl, which seems to break all the mixing rules: obvious enough to be crass, and, whatever you make of the tune itself, totally overplayed. But now he's got your attention, the DJ sets off on a slightly more discerning route to dancefloor ecstasy. Big hits like Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell's 'Ain't No Mountain High Enough' and Incognito featuring Jocelyn Brown's 'Always There' sit nicely next to more unfamiliar disco and early house numbers like Robert Strauss feat Leroy Burgess' 'Hot Like An Oven' and Musique's excellent, conga-strewn 'Love Massage'. And the overall effect is every bit as spry and perky as Hugh Hefner on a little blue pill.

Disc two, titled 'Sexy', moves into more downtempo territory that's commonly known to DJ-for-hire as 'the erection section': a mix of lush '60s and '70s soul that, kicking off with Tendy Pendergrass' 'Close The Door' and Barry White's 'I'm Gonna Love You Just A Little More Baby', does everything but ripping your clothes off itself. There are some fantastic records here, and while the whole package might be a little kitsch for some listeners – put this on in the company of your significant other and you may be accused of trying too hard – it's probably true few do this stuff better than Dimitri. Maybe you could smuggle it out the record shop in a brown paper bag.

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