Chicks on Speed Cutting the Edge Review

Album. Released 2009.  

BBC Review

They've probably released their masterpiece.

Ian Wade 2009

Chicks On Speed, for the uninitiated, are an international art/music/clothing/film experience who are based in Berlin. For the past decade they've been releasing mission statements, not playing guitars, running a label and generally being an acquired taste. They once had their own club night where they created an installation piece which was called I Wanna Be A DJ, Baby. They stood behind DJ decks and smashed records while a sound collage tape was playing. Some Red Hot Chili Peppers fans may recall throwing bottles of wee at them when they supported them in London a few years back. On this, their fifth album, they've gone all wonky double album on us, and in the process probably released their masterpiece.

Cutting The Edge is a 24 track feast of what makes the Chicks so unique, and is more in line with earlier albums such as 2000's Chicks On Speed Will Save Us All and 2003's 99Cents, as opposed to the more challenging areas of their output such as their 2004 collaboration with the No Heads.

Having collaborated in the past with DJ Hell, Karl Lagerfeld and Peaches (COS were embraced with open arms by the Electroclash set), Cutting The Edge sees the Chicks working with the likes of Whomadewho, the legendary Mark Stewart, Joe Robinson and Christopher 'I'm A Disco Dancer' Just amongst many others; recording in hotel rooms, trains and bathrooms along the way. Of the many highlights, the B-52's' Fred Schneider Skyped his contribution to Vibrator; Sewing Machine is based on a semi-hilarious tale of the band being mistaken for Kraftwerk; and previous singles Art Rules and Super Surfer Girl (chart-toppers in another dimension, I assure you) also feature in what has to be their most poptastic album yet.

So, Chicks On Speed then. Not convinced yet? See ya. For the rest of you, strap yourself in for the funnest most art-tastic and downright stupendously genius DIY album of the year.

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