Bantu feat Ayuba Fuji Satisfaction: Soundclash in Lagos Review

Album. Released 2005.  

BBC Review

Many of Ade Bantu's songs still retain that distinctively wobbling sound, generated by...

Martin Longley 2006

Unlikely though it might sound, Nigerian Fuji is indeed named after the evocative Japanese mountain. Existing for forty years, it's a descendent of traditional Yoruban singing and drumming that has now been passed on to an even younger generation in the shape of Adewale Ayuba.

Many of Ade Bantu's songs still retain that distinctively wobbling sound, generated by the under-arm apala talking drum, but there are an equal number where the Fuji elements are submerged by an Afrobeat and hip-hop majority.

The Cologne-based Bantu strike a good balance between hardness and commerciality, as all of these diverse elements are propelled by a tough production style, with a strong partying feel to the vocals. Besides Bantu and Ayuba, there are three other lead singers on hand, assisting with the rap, ragga and soul vocabularies, voiced in Yoruba, English, Pidgin English and even Spanish.

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