Frequently Asked Questions

BBC Music website

Using the site

Our Data

How can I get involved?

Using BBC Playlister

Listening via our partners

Third-party Terms and Conditions

Rights

Profanity

Other Questions

BBC Music website

What is this site for?

We aim to provide a comprehensive guide to music content across the BBC. This includes profiles of artists who appear on BBC programmes, and information about when and where they have been played. We hope that users can quickly and easily find the kind of shows that might suit their tastes.

Using the site

How do I find a particular artist?

If you’re looking for a particular artist who's not featured on one of our pages, there are two ways to get to their page:

1. Use the BBC search box at the top of this page.

2. If you know the artist’s MusicBrainz ID (found by searching on http://musicbrainz.org/) you can use that to compose the URL, like so: http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists/6cd3b12e-c899-4f59-a770-c217954f247a

Here "6cd3b12e-c899-4f59-a770-c217954f247a" is the artist’s MusicBrainz ID.

Our Data

Where does the data come from?

Since hand-building a page for every artist heard on the BBC would be beyond our resources, we’re taking basic data around names, discographies and other key information from MusicBrainz, a website which offers discographical information on artists from Abba to Zappa (along with about 600,000 others). The information on the site is contributed, edited and maintained by an international community of users (including many members of BBC staff involved in music broadcasting and content), in much in the same way as Wikipedia.

Incidentally, the artist biographies that we provide come from MusicBrainz via Wikipedia.

What if I find some content that's inaccurate?

Everybody is welcome to edit Wikipedia or MusicBrainz, and we are very keen to encourage experts among our users to contribute in this way. To edit MusicBrainz you will need to go through a simple registration process. Links are displayed on every artist page to edit entries for that artist in both places.

In the unlikely event that you have spotted something offensive on the discographies or tracklists, please contact us and let us know.

Artist play count information

We provide a list of artists most played on BBC radio within the past seven days. We would like to stress that this data should not be taken as a full and accurate record of the music that the BBC has played. We are continuously working to make the data more reliable.

If you wish to use feeds of this data to build your own content, please read our section on Rights.

How can I get involved?

How do I get my band an artist page?

If you're in a band or are involved in representing and promoting artists, you'll find guides to getting started with MusicBrainz and creating new artists here:

https://musicbrainz.org/doc/How_to_Create_an_Account

https://musicbrainz.org/doc/How_to_Add_an_Artist

How do I get my artist image added or changed?

If you're in a band or are involved in representing and promoting artists, you'll need to send an email to Musicfeedback@bbc.co.uk, specifying the artist and providing an image. Images need to be at least 1920 x 1080px in size. Please also note we can only display images with an aspect ratio of 16:9.

Important: for us to use an image you will need to confirm in writing that it is rights free in perpetuity across all platforms without a photographer’s credit.

What does this site offer developers?

Previously we were offering JSON and XML representations of our artist pages at: /music/artists/:mbz_guid.[xml|json]

As of October 2014 these are no longer available. However we are working on offering new and better APIs for developers to use in the coming months. More on that soon. In the meantime, if you have questions about this please send an email to BBCPlaylister@bbc.co.uk.

Using BBC Playlister

What is BBC Playlister?

BBC Playlister is a quick, simple way to find and keep track of the music you love.

Any time you hear a piece of music you love on the BBC, hit the “add to Playlister” button and that track will be waiting in Playlister for you to enjoy later.

As well as building up your own personal playlist of tracks, you can export and listen to them on your chosen music service. You can discover more new music with recommendations from across the BBC.

How can I find new tracks to add to my playlist?

Radio station playlists and programme tracklistings are a great place to find songs to add. Just look out for the “add to Playlister” button next to tracks.

The “Most Popular on Playlister” section has plenty of tracks you can add too.

You can also follow BBC presenters’ playlists. Go to the Presenters page via the main Playlister navigation. Once there you can follow a presenter by clicking on the "follow a presenter" button.

Why do you ask me to sign in to add tracks?

We ask you to sign in so you can add music from any device, and see your own Playlist wherever you are. So whatever you add on your computer will show up on your mobile or tablet (and vice versa).

How can I sign in to BBC iD?

You can sign in or register to BBC iD on any BBC page. It’s fast and free! Just look for “Sign in” at the top of the page. You can also sign in to the BBC using your Facebook or Google details.

Why do I have to export my tracks to listen to them in full?

The BBC doesn’t own the necessary rights to the tracks we play. So we’re not allowed to play the tracks in full on demand.

Instead we’re working with Deezer, iTunes, Spotify and YouTube to let you export and listen to your tracks in full on these services. As time goes on we’ll also be working with other music services so you can export your playlist to these too.

Why do I have to be 16 or over to export tracks?

On the BBC, we sometimes play edited versions of tracks with explicit content removed. That means things like swear words and sexual references.

However, third parties like Spotify and YouTube and Deezer may offer the unedited versions of such tracks. We need to be sure you’re 16 or over and warn you that you may hear the unedited versions.

Can I use any music services other than Deezer, iTunes, Spotify or YouTube?

We’re working with Deezer, iTunes, Spotify and YouTube, and will be adding other music services as time goes on. In the meantime, you can get a text list of your playlist and then search for them on any music service you choose.

Can anyone else see my playlist?

No, your playlist is private to you. If you’d like to share your playlist you can get a text-only list of your tracks and email this to a friend.

Can I have more than one playlist?

Not right now but you might be able to in the future. Watch this space.

Can I use BBC Playlister in the iPlayer Radio mobile app?

Yes, you can add tracks from live and on-demand programmes in the iPlayer Radio mobile app. You can also access the BBC Playlister homepage in the app by tapping "Information" on the menu and then the Playlister image.

Can I add tracks to Playlister from iPlayer?

Yes - you can add tracks to Playlister from many TV programmes such as Eastenders, Later... with Jools Holland, Strictly Come Dancing and various music documentaries. You have to be signed in to BBC iD then use your cursor to roll over the video picture. You should be able to see a Playlister button in the top right hand corner of the picture. Click on this and you will see the list of tracks used in the programme that you can add to your playlist.

This is only currently available on desktop browser versions of BBC iPlayer; we'll be looking at making it available on other platforms such as tablet apps in the future.

How can I leave feedback about BBC Playlister?

Tell us what you think. We’re always looking to improve Playlister, so please email your feedback to BBCPlaylister@bbc.co.uk or contact us on Twitter: @BBCPlaylister.

Listening via our partners

Why can’t I get all my tracks in Deezer, iTunes, Spotify or YouTube?

Some of the tracks we play on the BBC aren’t available on Deezer, iTunes, Spotify or YouTube. This might be because a track has not yet been released, in which case it should become available once it comes out. Or it could just be that a track we’ve played doesn’t feature in the Deezer, iTunes, Spotify or YouTube song library. In which case, congratulations on having such interesting musical tastes!

Why am I getting the wrong tracks when I export my Playlist?

When you export your playlist to Deezer, iTunes, Spotify or YouTube they do a search based on each track title and artist. If they can’t find the right track they’ll sometimes bring up something with a similar title or artist name.

In some cases this might bring up a different version of the same track, or a different track by the same artist. So, you never know, you might even stumble on something new.

Also bear in mind that your music provider may not find exact matches for any classical choices you export. The BBC commissions performances of pieces that are unique to particular radio or TV broadcasts and your provider will not have these. Instead you’ll get an approximate match based on the composer and work.

I can no longer export my playlist to YouTube – what’s happened?

If you’ve changed the way your playlist is ordered in YouTube from the default “Manual” (in your Playlist settings) to any other setting, then Playlister will no longer be able to export your playlist to YouTube. The good news is that if you go back to your Playlist settings in YouTube and change it back to “Manual”, then Playlister can start exporting your tracks again.

Does the BBC have any financial arrangement with Deezer, iTunes, Spotify or YouTube?

No, no money is changing hands between us and Deezer, iTunes, Spotify or YouTube.

I can no longer export my playlist to Spotify - what has happened?

This may be because you have deleted your BBC Playlister playlist from Spotify. If this is the case you can restore it from here.

Third-party Terms and Conditions

How will the BBC and Spotify use my information?

When you export, BBC Playlister will manage your Spotify account to create a playlist and add tracks.

The BBC will keep your information secure and not share with anyone else without your express permission in accordance with the BBC’s Privacy and Cookies Policy.

Sometimes the BBC uses third parties to process your information on our behalf. The BBC requires these third parties to comply strictly with its instructions and the BBC requires that they do not use your personal information for their own business purposes.

Spotify’s Privacy Policies and Terms & Conditions may differ from the BBC’s and allow them to use your information for their own purposes. Spotify’s use of cookies are handled in accordance with its own Cookies Policy. These Policies and Terms & Conditions apply when you’re on Spotify’s website or application, or streaming music through Spotify.

Terms and conditions for exporting to Spotify

BBC Playlister will share your tracks with your Spotify account.

While the BBC occasionally plays edited versions of tracks with strong language removed, Spotify may play unedited versions.

Playback from Spotify may contain adverts. These are not from the BBC.

How will the BBC and YouTube use my information?

BBC Playlister will manage your YouTube account to create a playlist and add tracks.

You will have to create a public profile in order to export your playlist to YouTube.

The BBC will keep your information secure and not share with anyone else without your express permission in accordance with the BBC’s Privacy and Cookies Policy.

Sometimes the BBC uses third parties to process your information on our behalf. The BBC requires these third parties to comply strictly with its instructions and the BBC requires that they do not use your personal information for their own business purposes.

YouTube’s Privacy Policies and Terms & Conditions may differ from the BBC’s and allow them to use your information for their own purposes. YouTube’s use of cookies are handled in accordance with its own Cookies Policy. These Policies and Terms & Conditions apply when you are on YouTube’s website or streaming music through YouTube.

Terms and conditions for exporting to YouTube

This will export the last 200 tracks you added.

BBC Playlister will manage your YouTube account to create a playlist and add tracks.

While the BBC occasionally plays edited versions of tracks with strong language removed, YouTube may play unedited versions.

Playback from YouTube may contain adverts. These are not from the BBC.

How will the BBC and Deezer use my information?

BBC Playlister will manage your Deezer account to create a playlist and add tracks.

The BBC will keep your information secure and not share with anyone else without your express permission in accordance with the BBC’s Privacy and Cookies Policy.

Sometimes the BBC uses third parties to process your information on our behalf. The BBC requires these third parties to comply strictly with its instructions and the BBC requires that they do not use your personal information for their own business purposes.

Deezer’s Privacy Policies and Terms & Conditions may differ from the BBC’s and allow them to use your information for their own purposes. Deezer’s use of cookies is handled in accordance with its own Cookies Policy. These Policies and Terms & Conditions apply when you are on Deezer’s website or streaming music through Deezer.

Terms and conditions for exporting to Deezer

BBC Playlister will manage your Deezer account to create a playlist and add tracks. Your Playlister playlist will be publicly available on Deezer unless you set it to private in your Deezer account.

While the BBC occasionally plays edited versions of tracks with strong language removed, Deezer may play unedited versions.

Playback from Deezer may contain adverts. These are not from the BBC.

How will the BBC and iTunes use my information?

The BBC will keep your information secure and not share with anyone else without your express permission in accordance with the BBC’s Privacy and Cookies Policy.

Sometimes the BBC uses third parties to process your information on our behalf. The BBC requires these third parties to comply strictly with its instructions and the BBC requires that they do not use your personal information for their own business purposes.

iTunes’s Privacy Policies and Terms & Conditions may differ from the BBC’s and allow them to use your information for their own purposes. iTunes’s use of cookies are handled in accordance with its own Cookies Policy. These Policies and Terms & Conditions apply when you are on the iTunes website or streaming music through iTunes.

Terms and conditions for exporting to iTunes

BBC Playlister will share your tracks with your iTunes account.

While the BBC occasionally plays edited versions of tracks with strong language removed, iTunes may play unedited versions.

The BBC receives no payment from iTunes for this service.

Rights

Rights

Wikipedia content is licensed, by Wikimedia, under an Attribution-ShareAlike Creative Commons Licence.

MusicBrainz data is licensed under the Creative Commons Public Domain and Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence. For more information have a look at the MusicBrainz Data Licences.

The BBC's album reviews are licensed under an Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike Creative Commons Licence. If you choose to use a review on your site please link back to the original page.

Profanity

Why does the BBC allow profane names of artists, tracks or albums to be displayed in full in some places while it hides them in others?

In a small fraction of the content we include in our pages from Wikipedia and MusicBrainz - specifically the names of artists, albums and tracks - there will be language that is offensive to some members of the audience. Context is a key factor in whether we choose to display such language in its original form, or to mask it by the use of asterisks. Our general principle is to avoid exposing users to such content accidentally, but not to censor it unduly.

In specific terms, wherever an artist name appears in a programme tracklist, search result or any other kind of aggregation, we will mask it. However, where users have chosen to navigate to an artist's page we feel it would be unnecessary and patronising to continue to mask the offending words, for example within the text of a biography. Similarly, where there are profanities in track names we will not display them in the context of tracklists for programmes that play a variety of artists, but we do display them in album tracklists on a page for a release or an album review, where someone viewing the page already has a general expectation of tone based on the artist or artists involved, the genre, the album cover etc.

By doing this, we feel we are applying a proportionate level of editorial control to avoid offence to casual users, without undue censorship of objective facts which might offend the common sense of other members of our audience.

Other Questions

What if I have a question about TV or Radio, where can I find the answer?

We have separate FAQ sections for television and radio.