Irving Berlin

Born 11 May 1888. Died 22 September 1989.
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Irving Berlin (1888-1989)

Donald Macleod explores the life and work of Irving Berlin

Featured in BBC Music Clips

Biography

Irving Berlin (born Israel Isidore Beilin, May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989) was an American composer and lyricist of Belarusian-Jewish origin (born near Mogilyov, Russian Empire, present-day Belarus), widely considered one of the greatest songwriters in American history, his music forming a great part of The Great American Songbook. He published his first song, "Marie from Sunny Italy", in 1907 and had his first major international hit, "Alexander's Ragtime Band" in 1911. He also was an owner of the Broadway theater the Music Box Theatre.

"Alexander's Ragtime Band" sparked an international dance craze in places as far away as Berlin's native Russia, which also "flung itself into the ragtime beat with an abandon bordering on mania." Over the years he was known for writing music and lyrics in the American vernacular: uncomplicated, simple and direct, with his stated aim being to "reach the heart of the average American," whom he saw as the "real soul of the country." In doing so, said Walter Cronkite, at Berlin's 100th birthday tribute, he "helped write the story of this country, capturing the best of who we are and the dreams that shape our lives."

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  • Founded Irving Berlin Music Company