Alexander Borodin
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1833-11-12
https://musicbrainz.org/artist/560b5e65-8d53-41b4-9913-83368f4721a0
Alexander Borodin

Alexander Borodin Biography (BBC)

Born the illegitimate son of a Georgian prince and his mistress, and registered as a serf on his father’s country estate, Alexander Borodin nevertheless enjoyed a cultured education in which the natural sciences vied for attention with musical accomplishments – a pattern that was to continue for the rest of his life. A solid medical training came first. In 1850 he began his training as a physician at St Petersburg’s Medical Surgical Academy, graduating with distinction six years later and returning to the Academy as a professor of chemistry from 1864.

By then music had established an equally important role in his life. Having played chamber music with fellow amateurs and written several works for small ensemble, he was introduced to the inspirational Mily Balakirev in October 1862 and became the last composer to join the Balakirev circle (later known as ‘The Five’ or ‘The Mighty Handful’). Borodin already knew Modest Musorgsky and was warmly welcomed by its two other members, Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov and César Cui.

Perhaps the most robustly gifted of the circle, Borodin took up Balakirev’s challenge and in 1867 completed his E flat major Symphony, the first major specimen of a short-lived Russian nationalism that also embraced the rhythmic energy of Beethoven, the delicacy of Schumann and, in its chattery scherzo, the fantasy of Berlioz.

Following the symphony’s successful 1869 premiere, Borodin found an ideal subject for a Russian grand opera in the supposed 12th-century epic The Lay of Igor’s Host; preliminary work on Prince Igor was abandoned after several numbers had been sketched in 1870. A Second Symphony incorporated some of the opera’s initial ideas and reflected its heroic stance through huge brass fanfares and sinuous melodies. The story of Prince Igor, resumed in 1874, runs like a thread through the rest of Borodin’s life. Isolated numbers were performed at various concerts organised by the Free School of Music, including the exotic and rhythmically vital evocation of an eastern culture in the ‘Polovtsian Dances’ – completed in 1879 with assistance from his fellow composers, including Rimsky-Korsakov.

By the beginning of the 1880s, having already made several honourable contributions to chemistry, Borodin was finding it increasingly difficult to balance his musical and medical responsibilities – a situation compounded by his wife’s ill health and a household constantly full of preying relatives and countless cats. He did nevertheless manage to produce one of the most carefree and melodically inspired string quartets in the repertory, his Second (1881), to celebrate 20 years of happy marriage to the pianist Yekaterina Protopopova.

Quite unexpectedly, minutes after dancing a waltz at a candlelight ball organised by the Medical-Surgical Academy in February 1887, he collapsed and died of heart failure. His musical legacy, with the performing version of Prince Igor (completed shortly after his death by Rimsky-Korsakov and Glazunov) as its centrepiece, remains small in output but big in vital inspiration.

Profile © David Nice

Alexander Borodin Biography (Wikipedia)

Alexander Porfiryevich Borodin (Russian: Алекса́ндр Порфи́рьевич Бороди́н;, 12 November 1833 – 27 February 1887) was a Russian Romantic composer of Georgian origin, as well as a doctor and chemist. He was one of the prominent 19th century composers known as The Mighty Handful, a group dedicated to producing a uniquely Russian kind of classical music, rather than imitating earlier Western European models.

Borodin is best known for his symphonies, his two string quartets, In the Steppes of Central Asia and his opera Prince Igor. Music from Prince Igor and his string quartets was later adapted for the US musical Kismet. A notable advocate of women's rights, Borodin was a promoter of education in Russia and founded the School of Medicine for Women in St. Petersburg.

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Featured Works


Alexander Borodin Performances

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Alexander Borodin
Polovtsian dances [from 'Prince Igor'] for orchestra
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Polovtsian dances [from 'Prince Igor'] for orchestra
Alexander Borodin
Polovtsian dances, from 'Prince Igor' for orchestra & chorus
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Polovtsian dances, from 'Prince Igor' for orchestra & chorus

Polovtsian dances, from 'Prince Igor' for orchestra & chorus

Choir
Romanian Radio Academic Chorus
Director
Dan Mihail Goia
Orchestra
Romanian Radio National Orchestra
Conductor
Cristian Orosanu
Alexander Borodin
Polovtsian dances (from 'Prince Igor') for orchestra [& chorus ad lib]
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Polovtsian dances (from 'Prince Igor') for orchestra [& chorus ad lib]
Alexander Borodin
Overture to 'Prince Igor'
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Overture to 'Prince Igor'
Alexander Borodin
Notturno (Andante) - 3rd movement from Quartet for strings no.2 in D major
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Notturno (Andante) - 3rd movement from Quartet for strings no.2 in D major
Alexander Borodin
In the Steppes of Central Asia
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In the Steppes of Central Asia
Alexander Borodin
Overture 'Prince Igor'
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Overture 'Prince Igor'
Alexander Borodin
Serenata alla Spagnola
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Serenata alla Spagnola
Alexander Borodin
Petite suite orch. Glazunov [orig. for piano], Nocturne [in A major]
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Petite suite orch. Glazunov [orig. for piano], Nocturne [in A major]
Alexander Borodin
Polovtsian Dances (Prince Igor)
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Polovtsian Dances (Prince Igor)
Alexander Borodin
In the steppes of central Asia (V sredney Azii) - symphonic poem
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In the steppes of central Asia (V sredney Azii) - symphonic poem
Alexander Borodin
Polovtsian dances [from 'Prince Igor'] for orchestra
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Polovtsian dances [from 'Prince Igor'] for orchestra
Alexander Borodin
Polovtsian Dances from Prince Igor (excerpt)
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Polovtsian Dances from Prince Igor (excerpt)
Alexander Borodin
In the steppes of central Asia [V sredney Azii] for orchestra
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In the steppes of central Asia [V sredney Azii] for orchestra
Alexander Borodin
Prince Igor - Act 3; Polovtsian march (Prelude)
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Prince Igor - Act 3; Polovtsian march (Prelude)
Alexander Borodin
Quartet no. 2 in D major for strings
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Quartet no. 2 in D major for strings
Alexander Borodin
Quartet on the name 'B-La-F' for strings..., 3rd mvt...; Serenata alla Spagnola
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Quartet on the name 'B-La-F' for strings..., 3rd mvt...; Serenata alla Spagnola
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