BBC World News Horizons examines how security innovations are combating crime and counterfeit drug production

We are a huge organisation, we have about 100,000 police officers, using 17,000 vehicles, 400 boats and 23 helicopters. It is very difficult to control everything without the use of technology."Colonel Alfredo Deak, Director of Technology, Sao Paulo Military Police
Date: 05.10.2012     Last updated: 18.03.2014 at 17.50
Category: BBC World News
In the twelfth episode of Horizons, Adam Shaw visits Sao Paulo, Brazil to look at the latest security innovations being deployed to tackle crime in one of Latin America’s largest cities, and Saima Mohsin travels to Delhi, India to see how South Asia is coping in the fight against counterfeit drugs.

With a population of over 41 million, Sao Paolo is a challenging proposition for the police, who are tasked with keeping the streets safe. In 2010 alone, the Sao Paulo State Police dealt with more than 43 million emergency calls – and it’s the sophisticated integration of different technologies that’s allowing them to do this.

The technologies being employed by the force include, Fotocrim, which enables real time information to be cross-referenced with a database of over half a million people; and Eagle Eye, a type of surveillance system and tablet technology. Together they’ve become an essential part of the policing tool kit.

Colonel Alfredo Deak, Director of Technology, Sao Paulo Military Police says: “We are a huge organisation, we have about 100,000 police officers, using 17,000 vehicles, 400 boats and 23 helicopters. It is very difficult to control everything without the use of technology.”

They are also trialling facial recognition software that can scan crowds tens of thousands strong. Developed in Israel for use in border control, the Biometric Facial Recognition system uses a mathematical algorithm to encode any face, maps facial features and create a unique numerical I-D. Adam Shaw tests this out at one of the biggest football matches of the season at the Pacaembu football stadium in Sao Paulo - with interesting consequences.

Next, Saima Mohsin travels to Delhi to explore what is being done about the proliferation of counterfeit drugs, one of the biggest dangers facing India today. It threatens lives, discourages patients from using lifesaving innovation and deters much-needed pharmaceutical investment.

Over the last three years, PharmaSecure has worked with companies in India to roll out their SMS authentication service on over 100 million drug packages for the domestic market. The system allows consumers to authenticate medicines by mobile phone.

Suresh Sati, Founder of INTACT, an organisation that seizes counterfeit drugs, says: “Those people that were previously dealing in drugs such as cocaine are coming into this field now. In India, the counterfeit drug trade is worth $10 billion, you will find four out of 10 brands are fake.”