Horizons examines how Amazonians are reacting to deforestation

I think that the next ten years will see the birth of the biosphere economy, in which the economics of nature will be something incorporated into business and worth paying for."Andrew Mitchell, Director of Global Canopy Programme
Date: 07.12.2011     Last updated: 18.03.2014 at 17.50
Category: BBC World News
BBC World News Horizons series concludes by visiting the Brazilian Amazon rainforest to look at how the relationship between nature and business is changing.

Horizons presenter, Adam Shaw, meets the people living and working in the Amazon who are planning and developing new sustainability projects, ecosystem services and technology that will help prevent deforestation over the next decade.

Brazil is the world’s largest exporter of beef, and a recent study states that seventy percent of deforestation is the result of cattle farming. Adam meets an American cattle farmer, in the State of Mato Grosso, who explains that open land is worth significantly more than forested land and he’s teaching landowners about the importance of reforestation to improve transportation and precipitation cycles.

Adam also meets an Amazonian tribe which faces extinction if mining companies, large scale loggers and small scale farmers continue to cut down the heart of the forest. Adam learns how the Almir Surui tribe is earning an income from ecosystem services showing companies how the forest can be a valuable resource. They’ve also started an educational project, Carbon Plan, which teaches how the carbon produced by the forest is essential in preventing climate change.

Adam talks to Andrew Mitchell, Director of Global Canopy Programme who explains that; “I think that the next ten years will see the birth of the biosphere economy, in which the economics of nature will be something incorporated into business and worth paying for.”

Finally, Horizons visits the INPE, Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research in Sao Paulo, where they’re taking one thousand photos of the forest every day to find out how, over the next ten years, new satellite technologies can be used to monitor deforestation. Satellites currently struggle to see through the clouds, but in the future radar technology will be able to measure the density of vegetation through the clouds, so selective logging can be detected more accurately.

The Horizons series, sponsored by DuPont, airs weekly on Fridays at 23:30, Saturdays at 02:30 and 15:30, and Sunday’s at 9:30 and 21:30 (all times GMT). For programme highlights and an insight into the future of global business visit www.horizonsbusiness.com. For all the latest news, behind-the-scenes pictures/videos and updates from Adam Shaw please follow at facebook.com/horizonsTVseries and/or on twitter at @horizonsbiz.

For further information, images or interviews with Adam Shaw or the series producer please contact:

Sarah Rabbitts, Global News Communications

E: sarah.rabbitts@bbc.co.uk

T: 0044 (0)787 241 2980