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13 November 2014

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You are in: Manchester > Introducing > Reviews > For Folk’s Sake at Cup

Tammy Hermann and Samson & Delilah performing at For Folk's Sake at Cup (c) Baris Sertkaya

Tammy Hermann and Samson & Delilah

For Folk’s Sake at Cup

If a picture can paint 1000 words, then how many songs can a stage full of instruments create? Judging by the presence of harp, banjo, theremin, several guitars, double bass and an assortment of percussion, For Folk's Sake is about to find out.

First on-stage is troubadour Zoe Mulford. Her short stories and striking observations are a delight - as are her banjo and guitar driven, melodically sung narratives.

Complementing this performance perfectly, we have folk-pop artist Tammy Hermann and a multitude of friends - also known as Samson & Delilah - on stand up bass, supporting vocals, piano and guitar.

Butler Williams performing at For Folk's Sake at Cup (c) Baris Sertkaya

Butler Williams

Tammy's performance is a full on lyrical assortment of thoughtful, evocative songs, delivered by a writer of exceptional ability and future potential.

Next on stage are the experimental and charismatic duo, Butler Williams. Talented percussionist, writer and songster Chris Butler employs a unique range instruments such as theremin, xylophone and melodica and does it very well indeed.

Butler Williams are an intriguing, amusing and thoroughly enjoyable act in the throws of a promising future. The audience appear to be fully aware of this and show it by applauding vigorously in between jokes, songs, musings and mind-boggling displays of instrumental craftsmanship.

Rebecca Joy Sharp performing at For Folk's Sake at Cup (c) Baris Sertkaya

Rebecca Joy Sharp

Our final performer tonight is the very wonderful Rebecca Joy Sharp. Her harp, her words and voice are an absolute joy to listen to.

The song The Stars Got Stuck is remarkably poignant and startlingly striking in its delivery and instrumentation. The stark wording set against a delightful shower of chimes, harmonics and soaring chord progressions is utterly beguiling and a perfect way to end a thoroughly enjoyable night.

last updated: 13/05/2009 at 11:03
created: 13/05/2009

You are in: Manchester > Introducing > Reviews > For Folk’s Sake at Cup



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