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24 September 2014
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A tribute to Bryan Glancy at a pub in Central Manchester

Ged Camera (gig: 03/02/06)
In a nicotine-stained, crowded back room, a gathering of like-minded people said their farewells to Bryan Glancy, the music scene stalwart who died recently. "I just wanted to say goodbye in a place we drank," says Mark Burgess, opening the evening.


Mark Burgess (pic: Ged Camera)
Mark Burgess (pic: Ged Camera)

The tales from the procession of musicians (including Burgess) are humorous and apocryphal. There’s the story of how Bryan managed to do the seemingly impossible and silence the verbose Alan Wise, while a barefoot Darren Poyzer stands on the pool table and regales the enthralled listeners with tales of the time Glancy, wearing sunglasses, attempted to drive them home at 3am, only to "miss" a roundabout and write off the car.

Darren Poyzer (pic: Ged Camera)
Darren Poyzer (pic: Ged Camera)

"Is it in tune?" one of the several artistes utters. "Does it matter?" comes the prompt response, and on an evening like tonight, it's more the emotion and goodwill that counts.

The overspill of affection has reached far. During New Order’s set at the Manchester v Cancer show, the band appeared on stage with ‘RIP Bryan Glancy’ sprayed on their amps, while Jimmy Oakes has flown from America to be here tonight.

Graham Clark (pic: Ged Camera)
Graham Clark (pic: Ged Camera)

There’s turns from Graham Clark, Chas Rigby, the poet Mike Garry, and Mark Kennedy, all  joining the ranks wanting to play a few of Bryan’s songs, but most poignantly, Bryan’s girlfriend allowed us a brief insight into the personal loss of not being able to say goodbye in person to the one you love.

Then by the miracles of technology and a lost distant link from an unknown location, Bryan appears, in the form of a recorded gig played on a projector screen, to close the night. The talking stops and all eyes are focussed on the centre of attention. The applause is loud and prolonged.  What more could one want as a send off?

last updated: 06/02/06
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