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28 October 2014
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Chinatown


A subject in the video Twelve
A subject in the video Twelve

Twelve

What does Chinese New Year mean to younger Chinese people in Manchester? And how are they seen in the wider community? Twelve artists were given the task. The result is a piece of video art called Twelve - on the BBC Big Screen:

Twelve: on the BBC Big Screen
Description:A video installation for Chinese New Year being shown on the BBC Big Screen. First screening 17:00 on Saturday 28 January then at intervals across the week.
Start Date:28/01/2006
Start Time:17:00
Genres:Performing Arts, Outdoors & Attractions
Venue Name:BBC Big Screen, Exchange Square
Venue Town:Manchester

Twelve is piece of video art showing ordinary people photographed in two different states: once looking relaxed, and then again in exuberance.

Twelve Chinese and East Asian artists who make up the Curio Shop Arts Network were asked to photograph friends, family and colleagues. Many of the subjects are Chinese - but not all. The end product is a digital flip book of portraits.

Images from Twelve on BBC Big Screen
And another...

The number of artists is significant because of the twelve signs of the Chinese astrological calendar - or Chinese Zodiac. And Twelve is being shown on Saturday 28 January to coincide with the eve of Chinese New Year - the Year of the Dog.

It's the idea of Ken Chu, artist in residence at the Chinese Arts Centre.

"Chinese New Year means different things to different Chinese people. If you are of immigrant status, then it's a very real part of your identity. But if you are second or third generation Chinese then you're more removed from it - it's a kind of exotic thing, it's quirky.

"I think Chinese people are seen as only part of the Chinese community. I wanted to show them as British citizens who are part of a wider cultural community."

So why show people in a state of joy?

"Chinese New Year is a time of celebration. And in the middle of winter, I think it would be nice to offer the people of Manchester something joyful and uplifting as they walk past the Big Screen."

Artists who took part include Amy Cham, Debbie Chan, Nina Chua, Jess Emmett, Ying Kwok, Kazuko Kuroda, Kwong Lee, and Yuen Fong Ling

last updated: 27/01/06
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