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20 September 2014
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The Great Hall
An elaborate door for a grandiose room
To the Senate & People of Liverpool

The central masterpiece of the building.


Designed predominately by Elmes, but there are splashes of Cockerell’s influence.

SEE ALSO
St George's Hall Map
History
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Great Hall
Concert Hall
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The inspiration for the design is Roman - complete with doors including the letters S.P.Q.L. which are an adaptation of ‘Senatus Populusque Romanus’ and mean to the Senate and People of Liverpool!

The Great Hall
It's not called The Great Hall for nothing.

The hall is 169 feet long including recesses at both ends and 74 feet wide including balconies. The long sides of the hall are divided in 5 bays by columns made of polished porphyry.

The Organ
This was added by Cockerell and was intended as the musical foundation for events in the hall. The addition of the organ required that 2 of the original granite columns be removed, these were eventually transferred to the entrance of Sefton Park.

organ
Play us a tune on the old joanna.

The bellows for the organ were originally powered by the steam engine in the basement but in 1931 the organ was enlarged to 120 stops (from 100) and converted to electro-pneumatic action.


The first organist was Mr WT Best in 1855, after the opening. The refurbishment of the organ will cost nearly £500,000 and is aimed to be completed in line with the other works.

The Floor
It is made of two sections. The central sunken section and the outside border. Made of encaustic tiles by Minton there are an estimated 30,000 tiles used. The difference in wear between the two sections is due to the decision taken in 1860 to cover the central well with a wooden floor to provide a more suitable surface for dancing.

 

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