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Abolition

You are in: Leicester > Abolition > Edward Juba

Olaudah Equiano

Another freed slave, Olaudah Equiano

Edward Juba

Edward Juba experienced an incredible social rise during his time in Leicestershire. He was brought to the county as a slave, but was eventually made the first black Freeman of the City of Leicester. Read more about his life...

Edward Juba was taken from his family in Africa as a young child and brought to England as a slave.

He went to work in the home of Lord Wentworth in Kirby Mallory in Leicestershire, and he seems to have earned the family's favour.

BBC Radio Leicester's Bridget Blair went to find out more about Edward Juba's life…

There are documents at the Record Office for Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland that mark various points in Edward's life, and one is a record of his baptism.

From rags to riches

Pat Grundy, a researcher at the Records Office, says it seems that Edward was treated well:

"He seems to have been very kindly treated there, and in his baptism entry, unusually, there are the names of three sponsors, one of whom was Wentworth"

Pat Grundy, Record Office researcher

"He seems to have been very kindly treated there, and in his baptism entry, unusually, there are the names of three sponsors, one of whom was Wentworth himself."

Edward worked for Lord Wentworth for 13 years before he left to become an apprentice ward-comber in Peckleton.

When he finished his apprenticeship he moved to Leicester and married Anne Mugglestone, a white girl from the city.

Eventually Edward was made a Freeman of the City of Leicester. He was the first black man and ex-slave to become a Freeman, and it seems he was highly respected.

Edward's legacy

One hundred and fifty years on, Edward's ancestors still live in the county, in the village of Seagrave.

Amanda Thompson is six generations on from Edward, but she and her family are still proud of their "famous ancestor".

last updated: 16/04/2008 at 14:05
created: 19/03/2007

You are in: Leicester > Abolition > Edward Juba



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