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18 June 2014
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Immigration and Emigration
Little Tipperary: The Irish in Lochee

Dundee's Irish population differed from the west coast and Clydeside Irish in one important aspect, in that, despite being steeped in Irish politics and history, there was little in the way of sectarianism, and, in fact, according to TM Devine, the city was "usually quiet" on that front.

One reason for this may have been that there were far fewer immigrants from Ulster settling in Dundee than arrived in Glasgow, therefore reducing the potential for sectarian rivalry.

Another reason for Dundee's lack of sectarianism in comparison to other cities that had high levels of Irish immigration is given by Janice Murray in her book The Miles to Dundee, who argues that the high proportion of single women that came to work - some 71% of Dundee's Irish-born workforce were female - greatly reduced the opportunities for religious tension.

A drawing of Lochee
© SCRAN
To this day the Lochee area of Dundee is still regarded as a largely Catholic area with its roots steeped in Irish tradition. The proportion of Irish-born people residing in the area has obviously fallen as the descendents of the immigrants have married into the Scots population, but the people of Lochee are still fiercely proud of their Irish heritage.


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