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CLIP 11543

The Cod Wars (audio)

The Cod Wars (audio)
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Key Info
  • The Cod Wars (audio)
  • Duration: 09:00
  • The report begins with archive recordings of an Icelandic coast guard warning a foreign trawler to leave the area. Coast Guard Christian Jonsson explains the orders he was given to expand Iceland's fishing area. Ken Knox, a British fisherman, was already a veteran of a cod war with Iceland when he became involved in the second one in 1972. He describes the make-shift weapons the fishermen used to repel the Icelandic coast guard. Christian describes how they would try to damamge the fishermen's nets, Ken describes how they would try to outrun the approaching coast guard boats. The British navy became involved in trying to uphold the fishing rights. Both sides would try to ram each other's ships at sea. Christian describes a feeling of mutual respect between the warring parties. The dispute was resolved but foreign fishermen were given poorer fishing grounds. This clip from ‘Witness’ is published on the World Service website: bbc.co.uk/programmes/p004t1hd and was first broadcast on 24 September 2010. Please note this is an audio clip and only available in Flash.
  • Subject:

    Citizenship and Modern Studies

       Topic:

    Rights: Human Legal Consumer

  • Keywords: geography, conflict, economics, fishing, sea, ocean, Iceland, trade, territory, Witness
Ideas for use in class
  • A geo political look at “conflict over land” – or sea! Can be used to stimulate discussion on Rights to own land – how can it be defined? What should be done as a compromise? Why are the two sides unhappy? What might be a good international solution? Why might each side not be happy with this?
Background details
  • Clip language : English
  • Aspect ratio : 16x9

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