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CLIP 6438

Motorways in central London: how public protest stopped construction

Motorways in central London: how public protest stopped construction
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Key Info
  • Motorways in central London: how public protest stopped construction
  • A demonstration of how public protest stopped the construction of a planned scheme to introduce elevated motorways into central London. The London box was an inner London motorway system planned in the 1970s but never built due to public outcry. Demonstrates the impact of major infrastructure projects and how public protest can influence politicians about planning decisions. This clip has subtitles available in Flash.
  • Subject:

    Construction and The Built Environment

       Topic:

    Impact of Design

  • Keywords: building, architectural, design, influences, factors, process, principles, aesthetic, economic, social, develop, roads, protesting, political, utilities, CBE, subtitled
Ideas for use in class
  • Provides a good illustration of how planners found a solution to a problem but did not consider the implications of the solution on the local communities. Following the clip students could be asked to consider the infrastructure requirements for a new housing estate. Compare a small town in the UK two hundred years ago with today and identify the differences in infrastructure. Research the planning regulations and the local plan to understand what development is permitted and how control is maintained between living, working and social areas.
Background details
  • Clip language : English
  • Aspect ratio : 16x9

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