Session 4

Find out about Britain's Great Storm, listen to weather reports, practise grammar and vocabulary and write a report about the weather where you are.

ክፍለ-ስራሓት ናይዚ ምዕራፍ

ድምር ነጥቢ ናይዚ ክፍለ-ስራሓት 4

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    Activity 1
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    Activity 2
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    Activity 3
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    Activity 4

A 'hurricane' in the UK

In 1987 Britain was hit by a huge storm when hurricane-force winds reached speeds of 122mph. This was very unusual weather for the UK. Trees and power lines were blown down, cars and houses crushed and more than 18 people were killed.

The storm was a big news story in the UK. Watch this video to find out more.

Listening challenge

Which of these two numbers are NOT mentioned in the report? The answer is towards the bottom of the page.

300     250     122     3     22     7.3

Watch the video and do the activity

ነቲ ቅዳሕ ጽሑፍ ኣርእይዎ ነቲ ቅዳሕ ጽሑፍ ሕብእዎ

Newsreader
Southern Britain is clearing up after the worst night of storms since records began almost 300 years ago.

Voiceover
The infamous storm of October 1987 can't be classed officially as a hurricane, as it didn't occur in the Tropics.

Newsreader
The weather forecasters admit they got it wrong.

Voiceover
But its 122 mile an hour gusts were every bit as devastating: millions of trees were flattened.

Newsreader
A graphic example of the power of the storm.

Voiceover
Half a million homes lost electricity.

Newsreader
Large areas of London and the south-east had power cuts.

Voiceover
22 people lost their lives.

Newsreader
The emergency services said they had little or no warning.

Voiceover
The damage caused had an estimated cost of £7.3 billion.

Newsreader
The West End took a battering: some department stores had their shop fronts blown out.

Voiceover
The UK had rarely experienced a weather event like it.

Newsreader
A Sealink ferry blown aground near Folkestone.

Voiceover
And when we get hit by our next one is entirely up to the Atlantic Ocean.

To do

Now let's do a comprehension quiz. Test yourself in this activity.

True or false?

8 Questions

Decide if these sentences about the report are true or false, and drag them into the correct column

ኣገናዕ፡ ፈተናኹም ዛዚምኩም
Excellent! Great job! ሕማቕ ዕድል! ዘመዝገብኩምዎ ነጥቢ ...:
x / y

True or false?

8 Questions

Decide if these sentences about the report are true or false, and drag them into the correct column

ኣገናዕ፡ ፈተናኹም ዛዚምኩም
Excellent! Great job! ሕማቕ ዕድል! ዘመዝገብኩምዎ ነጥቢ ...:
x / y

Did you spot the numbers that weren't mentioned in the report?

They were 250 and 3. The other numbers were mentioned because:

  • Records began almost 300 years ago
  • The wind speed was 122 mph (miles per hour)
  • 22 people lost their lives
  • The damage caused had an estimated cost of £7.3 billion

Next

We've heard about some very bad weather that the UK experienced and heard some more weather words. There are more words to hear in the next activity when take a look at weather around the world. Let's step outdoors!

 

 

ናይ ስዋስው ክፍሊ

  • We use might / may / could + verb: for present & future possiblitites; for guesses about the present; when we aren’t sure if something will happen in the future. 

    • I might go to the exhibition this afternoon. (future)
    • He’s in Eastern Europe. He may be in Ukraine. (present)
    • We could have some problems next year. (future)

    We use might not / mightn’t and may not to talk about negative possibility. We cannot use could not / couldn’t for possibility in the same way as might not and may not

    • We might not move into the new offices next year.
    • Our client may not agree with us.

Session Vocabulary

  • devastating
    causing a lot of damage

    hurricane-force
    very strong and damaging

    tornado
    a very strong wind that goes quickly round in a circle or funnel

    took a battering
    suffered very badly