Sesión 1

Someone, nothing and anywhere are useful pronouns in English. As you probably know, there are lots of other similar pronouns, which can be confusing. So we help you learn the differences in this session!

Sesiones en esta unidad

Sesión 1 puntuación

0 / 10

  • 0 / 0
    Actividad 1
  • 0 / 5
    Actividad 2
  • 0 / 5
    Actividad 3

Actividad 1

6 Minute Vocabulary

Someone, nothing, anywhere...

Tracey thinks there’s someone else in her boyfriend’s life. Find out why she thinks that and learn about words like someone, nothing and anywhere in 6 Minute Vocabulary.

Escuchar el audio

Mostrar la transcripción Ocultar la transcripción

Finn
Hello! Welcome to 6 Minute Vocabulary. I'm Finn...

Catherine
And I'm Catherine. And today we're talking about words like someone, nothing and anywhere.

Finn
So, let's start by listening to Tracey. She's talking to a friend about a problem she has.

Catherine
And here's a question for you: What is Tracey worried about? Here she is.

INSERT
Tracey
My boyfriend seems to be very busy these days. I'm worried there’s someone else in his life. I mean, most evenings he could be anywhere for all I know. He always says that he couldn't love anyone except me. And everyone knows that you should trust people you love. But do you think I should say something to him? There's no one else I can ask.

Finn
So that's Tracey. And we asked you: What is Tracey worried about?

Catherine
And the answer is: She's worried that there's someone else in her boyfriend's life.

Finn
Oh yes. Now someone is one of the words we're looking at today. Someone means one person but it doesn’t say who.

Catherine
That's right, Tracey doesn't know who it might be. And someone often goes with the word else. Someone else means one other person.

Finn
And Tracey used other words with one in them. Listen for them in this clip.

INSERT CLIP 1
He always says that he couldn't love anyone except me. And everyone knows that you should trust people you love... There’s no one else I can ask.

Catherine.
Right, so there's anyone. That also means one person, but anyone is used mostly in questions and negative sentences.

Finn
Then there's everyone: Everyone means all people.

Catherine
And no one. There's no one else I can ask. Notice the word else again,. No one else means no other person. You can also say anyone else.  Or everyone else. That means all other people.

Finn
Now, in written English, someone, anyone and everyone are all one word but no one is two words: no and one.

Catherine
That's right. And somebody, anybody, everybody and nobody are used in exactly the same way as someone, anyone and the others. But nobody is one word. So that's different from no one.

Finn
Let's have another clip.

INSERT CLIP 2
But do you think I should say something to him?

Catherine
So this time we heard something. And of course we can also have anything, everything and nothing.

Finn
And something means: one thing.

Catherine
Anything and everything mean all things.

Finn
And nothing means - no thing.

Catherine
OK. Now let's look at the verbs we use with all these words. Tracey said: there's someone else and everyone knows.

Finn
She did. The interesting thing here is that they're singular verbs: is and knows. We always always use a singular verb with these words. And what about the verb with no one and nothing?

Catherine
Like in the sentence: There's no one else I can ask…

Finn
That's right, it's a singular verb again. We say there is not there are. And notice that it's positive. It’s a common mistake to use a negative verb with the no words. So we don’t say 'no one isn’t going'.

Catherine
We say no one is going. And there’s an important point to make about everyone and everybody. Even though the verb is singular, we use they, their and them.

Finn
So: Everyone says they will come to the party.

Catherine
Exactly. And it's the same with no one and nobody. Nobody wants to know their exam results! And now for the last clip.

INSERT CLIP 3
I mean, most evenings he could be anywhere for all I know. 

Catherine
Now usually anywhere, anyone or anything, mean one place, person or thing. For example Is there anywhere to park the car?

Finn
But here anywhere means in any place, it doesn't matter where exactly. And you can use anyone or anything in the same way.

Catherine
So ask anyone means it doesn't matter who you ask.

Finn
And I'll eat anything means it doesn't matter what I eat.

IDENT          
6 Minute Vocabulary from BBC Learning English.

Finn
Right, it's quiz time! Here’s number one: Which is correct? a) Anyone knows that London is the capital of the UK. Or b) Everyone knows that London is the capital of the UK.

Catherine
It's b).

Finn
That's the one! Number two: a) Are you inviting anyone other? b) Are you inviting anyone else?

Catherine
It's b) again.

Finn
And now number three: a) Everyone put their coats on and left. b) Everyone put on his coat and left. 

Catherine
And it’s a).

Finn
Very good! Well done if you got all of those right.

Catherine
And before we go, here's a vocabulary tip. We often use someone, anyone, everyone and no one before adjectives and infinitives. So Is there anything nice to eat? Or there’s nothing to eat. Try making other sentences like that with these words and write them in your notebook.

Finn
There's more about this at bbclearningenglish.com. So, join us again soon for more 6 Minute Vocabulary.

Both
Bye!

Downloads

You can download 6 Minute Vocabulary from our Intermediate Unit 13 Downloads page. Remember, you can also subscribe to the podcast version.

Next

Would anyone like to do some practice? Go to the next page where everyone can have a go at some activities.

Sesión de vocabulario

  • Pronouns with: Some, no, any, every

    someone
    something
    somebody
    somewhere

    nothing
    no one
    nowhere
    nobody

    anyone
    anybody
    anywhere
    anything

    everyone
    everybody
    everywhere
    everything