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Урок 1: The Grammar Gameshow
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Welcome to the Grammar Gameshow! Test your knowledge in this crazy quiz! The presenter is a bit strange, the points don't make sense and the prizes could use some improvement, but at least the grammar is correct!

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    Упражнение 1

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Episode 22: Question Tags

Liz is really hanging in there! She’s a fighter and there’s no mistaking it! But can she keep fighting when she meets Felicia? This time they will need to answer questions on question tags! Those little auxiliary verb plus pronoun combinations for checking and asking! Who will succeed? Will Liz equal Mya’s record? Can you do better? Find out in this episode of the Grammar Gameshow!

Watch the video and then test yourself below with our quiz

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Will
Hello, and welcome to today’s Grammar Gameshow! I’m your host, Will! Just try and contract me, you’ll see what happens! And of course, let’s not forget Leslie, our all-knowing voice in the sky.

Leslie
Hello, everyone!

Will
Tonight, we’re going to ask you three questions about…

Leslie
Question tags! Those little auxiliary verb plus pronoun combinations for checking and asking!

Will
OK! Now, let’s meet our contestants!

Liz
Hello, all. My name’s Liz!

Will
And contestant number two?

Felicia
It’s nice to meet you. I’m Felicia!

Will
Nice to see you again, Liz! This will be four in a row for you, won’t it? Win this one and you’ll be our longest running contestant, won’t you? This is Gameshow history, isn’t it?

Liz
I’ll do my best!

Will
That’s the spirit. I might even let it help you. OK. Let’s get going, and don’t forget you can play along at home too. Here comes round one! Fingers on buzzers. What is the basic rule for construction of a question tag?

Felicia
Use an auxiliary verb that matches the main verb phrase, but opposite – such as positive to negative. Then, add a pronoun that refers to the subject.

Leslie
Correct!

Will
Well done! Let’s get some practice. I’ll give you the sentence, and you’ll give me the question tag. He can play football.

Felicia
He can play football, can’t he?

Leslie
Correct!

Will
You didn’t see James.

Liz
You didn’t see James, did you?

Leslie
Correct!

Will
She never cleans up.

Felicia
She never cleans up, does she?

Leslie
Correct!

Will
They have been to France

Liz
They’ve been to France, haven’t they?

Leslie
Correct!

Will
You hardly ever study.

Felicia
You hardly ever study, do you?

Leslie
Correct!

Will
I’m amazingly cool

Liz
I’m amazingly cool, aren’t I?

Leslie
Correct!

Will
Err…

Liz
Sorry. You are amazingly cool, aren’t you?

Leslie
Also correct, though factually inaccurate.

Will
No bread or water for you tonight, Leslie! Do your job!

Leslie
That was good work, wasn’t it? Question tags are used to ask questions or check information. They are constructed by using an auxiliary verb from the main verb phrase and a pronoun referring to the subject. If the main verb phrase is affirmative, the question tag should be negative and vice versa!

Will
Well done, both of you. 10 points to Felicia and five to Liz.

Liz
What? Why five?

Will
You’re nearly our next champion. You didn’t think we were going to just give it to you, did you? Our last champion was so wonderful. I’ll never forget her. Good old… Mya? Mya! Mya.  Anyway, on to round two. This is a triple threat round. Three questions… get them right all to score. Question one: What is the question tag for an imperative, such as: ‘Be quiet’?

Liz
Use a modal verb like ‘could’ or ‘will’. Be quiet, could you?

Leslie
Correct!

Will
That’s just rude! Minus three points. Question two: What is the pronoun used in a question tag for sentences using ‘there’, such as: ‘There’s no hope!’

Liz
We repeat the ‘there’. There’s no hope, is there?

Leslie
Correct!

Will
You should never give up hope! Minus 100 points for being a pessimist. Last question: What is the pronoun used in question tags using words like ‘somebody’ or ‘something’?

Liz
For ‘somebody’ we use ‘they’. Somebody wants me to win, don’t they? As for ‘something’, we use ‘it’. Something went wrong, didn’t it?

Leslie
Correct!

Will
Leslie?

Leslie
Nice, nice, nice! Imperatives have no auxiliary verb. To make a question tag with one, use a modal verb such as ‘could’, ‘would’ or ‘will’, but be careful of being impolite. For sentences using ‘there’ as a subject, also use ‘there’ in the question tag. Finally, with words like ‘somebody’, ‘everybody’ and  ‘nobody’, use ‘they’. And for ‘something’, ‘everything’, and ‘nothing’, use ‘it’.

Will
Well done, Felicia! 60 points to you!

Liz
But I answered the questions!

Will
Come on, champ! No one likes a sore loser! Suck it up a bit!

Felicia
Yeah! Suck it up a bit, won’t you?

Will
No one likes a sore winner either, Felicia.

Felicia
Yes, sir. Sorry, sir.

Will
On to our last question. Is this question tag correct? When would someone use it? ‘You’re getting married, are you?’

Felicia
Yes, it’s correct. Double positive tags are possible.

Will
Why?

Felicia
Funny that… it’s dropped out of my head.

Will
Liz?

Felicia
They often express surprise or concern or other emotional emphasis.

Will
Very professionally done, champ. Leslie?

Leslie
I couldn’t have put it better myself… so I won’t! Double positive question tags are common after affirmative sentences. They are usually used as responses to something that has just been said. The speaker repeats the information they’ve just heard and uses the tag to show interest, surprise, concern or some other emotional emphasis.

Will
Excellent work! You’re a fighter Liz. That’s why I’m giving you minus 12 points. And that brings us to the end of today’s Grammar Gameshow. Let’s count out the points… And the winner is… Liz with 53. Well done! Here’s what you’ve won!

Leslie
It’s a boxing glove! You’re king of the world, champ!

Will
We’ll see you again next week, where you can play for another prize. And Felicia… you didn’t really stand a chance, did you?

Felicia
How does any of this make any sense?

Will
It doesn’t even matter! Free the horses! It looks like we’ll need another contestant. Thanks for joining us. Say goodbye Leslie!

Leslie
Pa makha de kha Leslie!

Will
See you next time.

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Did you like that? Why not try these?

TGG_Teaser 6mingram_li_27_question_tags.jpg News Review Exercise

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Question tags

Question tags are an auxiliary verb subject pronoun combination that sit at the end of a sentence. They are most commonly used to ask a question, or to check information that the speaker already believes they know in order to confirm it.
This is about question tags, isn't it?

Making question tags
Question tags are constructed with an auxiliary verb from the main verb phrase and a pronoun referring to the subject of the sentence. Question tags usually swap polarity. If the main verb phrase is affirmative, the question tag is negative and vice versa.

John will arrive soon, won't he?
You haven't seen Jenny, have you?

No auxiliary verb
In certain tenses, there may be no obvious auxiliary verb. Tenses such as the present simple and past simple combine their auxiliary verbs with the main verb in the affirmative form. To make the question tag, use the same auxiliary verb as you would for a question - present simple with 'do/ does', and past simple with 'did'.

They know, don't they?
I went by myself, didn't I?

Intonation
Generally speaking, if a question tag is spoken with a rising intonation, the speaker is genuinely asking the question and would like to know the answer. If the tag is spoken with a falling intonation, it means the speaker believes they know the answer and is probably looking for agreement or confirmation.

Imperatives
Imperatives are often used as commands or an informal way of speaking between friends. They have no tense and an implied subject. For example, be quiet. To make an imperative into a question tag, we use a modal verb such as 'will', 'could' and 'would' and the subject pronoun 'you'. Be careful of appearing rude!

Be quiet, will you!
Don't shut the door, could you?
Do sit down, wouldn't you?

There
If a sentence has 'there' as a subject, use 'there' in the question tag.
There's no one here, is there?

Somebody and something
When somebody, everybody or nobody is the subject, use 'they' in the question tag. When something, everything or nothing is, use 'it'.
Somebody was here, weren't they?
Nothing's wrong, is it?

Double positive tags
Double positive question tags are possible. They are used as emphatic responses or replies to something that has just been said. They often show surprise, concern or some other emotional emphasis. The speaker most often repeats the information they've just heard and adds the question tag.

A:
I'm getting married in May.
B:
You're getting married, are you!?

To do

Try our quiz to see how well you've learned today's language. 

The Grammar Gameshow Quiz

4 Questions

Complete the sentence with the correct question tag.

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Downloads

Click on the links to download the audio and PDF document for this episode. 

More

That's all from Leslie and the contestants for this episode. Why not go to The Grammar Gameshow homepage to watch another one?