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Сеанс работы 8

Are they chasing geese – or horses? We show you how to use the phrase wild-goose chase from William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet - and bring you some other popular animal idioms!

 

Сеансы работы в этом уроке

0 / 15

  • 0 / 5
    Упражнение 1
  • 0 / 4
    Упражнение 2
  • 0 / 6
    Упражнение 3

Упражнение 2

To chase, or not to chase: that is the question.

Nobody enjoys being sent on a wild-goose chase, but it can happen. Let's check you know the meaning and form of the phrase wild-goose chase, so you can use it next time you are sent on a pointless journey!

To do

Listen to this extract of the animation to help you remember what the narrator said, then do the quick quiz to check you understood.

Прослушать аудио и закончить упражнение

Показать текст Скрыть текст

Narrator
In modern English, a wild-goose chase isn't about horses, or geese: it describes a situation where you foolishly chase after something that is impossible to get - or doesn't exist at all. Take US writer Bryant McGill, who said:

Clip 1
Endless consumerism sends us on a wild-goose chase for happiness through materialism.

Clip 2
We looked for the restaurant for hours, but it was a wild-goose chase: turned out that it closed down years ago!

Now have a go at this quiz. Look at the transcript if you need extra help.

To chase or not to chase...

4 Questions

Are you ready to use wild-goose chase? Answer the questions in this quiz to find out.

Поздравления
Excellent! Отлично! Bad luck! Вы набрали:
x / y

How did you do?
3-4 correct - well done - you understand wild-goose chase and are ready to learn some new animal idioms!
0-2 correct - oh dear! Have a look at the vocabulary box and try again.

Language note

The phrase wild-goose chase is normally used with the article a:

  •  a wild-goose chase 

 It can be used in the passive form with the verb send and the preposition on:

  • She was sent on a wild-goose chase

Or the active form with the verb go or the verb send and the preposition on:

  • I went on a wild-goose chase
  • He sent me on a wild-goose chase

Or we can use the verb be:

  • It was a wild-goose chase 
  • This is a wild-goose chase

Next

You now know the phrase wild-goose chase, but do you know what animal idiom we use to describe how tiring and competitive modern life can be - particularly in big cities?

Here's a clue: it's a ______ race! Which animal goes in the gap?

Go to the next page to find out the answer and learn more useful animal idioms!

Сеанс работы над лексикой

  • For more great Shakespeare content visit our partner,The OU >

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    Wild-goose chase

    Meaning
    In modern English, a wild-goose chase isn't about horses, or geese: it describes a situation where you foolishly chase after something that is impossible to get - or doesn't exist at all.

    Example sentence
    We looked for the restaurant for hours, but it was a wild-goose chase: turned out that it closed down years ago!

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    Extra vocabulary

    star-crossed lovers
    very unlucky lovers

    to have a crush on someone 
    to like someone - in a romantic way

    unrequited love
    when someone is in love with someone who doesn't feel the same way

    a rat race
    a way of modern life in which people compete for wealth and power

    to have a whale of a time
    to enjoy yourself very much

    to be in the doghouse
    to be in trouble - normally with your partner!

    pigs might fly!
    that will never happen!

    hold your horses!
    wait! Be patient!

    to be on your high horse  
    to behave in a superior or conceited manner 

    get off your high horse!
    stop behaving in a superior manner!

    don't count your chickens...
    don't make ​plans that ​depend on something good ​happening before you ​know that it will really happen

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    About Shakespeare Speaks

    Shakespeare Speaks is a co-production between:

    BBC Learning English

    The Open University

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