Session 4

In this session, we'll show you a game you can play with a friend to help you practise asking what something is like.  

We'll also learn an informal use of the word like from a famous BBC radio presenter.

Sessions in this unit

Session 4 score

0 / 8

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    Activity 1
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    Activity 2
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    Activity 3
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    Activity 4

Activity 3

It's, like, so confusing!

Listen to the clip again.

Nick says:

  • "Her job is to, like, look after me..."

Here it's used as a filler. Fillers are words or sounds that don't have a specific meaning. Instead, they allow the speaker more time to think.

Look at these examples:

  • That's, like, so unfair!
  • He's, like, a really good guy.I wonder if I could, like, borrow your camera?

He also says:

  • "She was like: "Ok, ok, ok.""

Here it's used to mark reported speech. In other words, it's said before you quote somebody. The form is: to be + like.

Look at these examples:

  • When I told him about my new car, he was like: "I don't believe you!"
  • She asked if I wanted to go to the pub. I was like: "Yeah, that's cool. When shall we meet?"

To do

Time to mix it all up now! Try this quiz to see if you can identify all four of the different uses of like we've seen so far.

I really, like, love quizzes!

4 Questions

How well do you know your 'likes'?

Congratulations you completed the Quiz
Excellent! Great job! Bad luck! You scored:
x / y

I really, like, love quizzes!

4 Questions

How well do you know your 'likes'?

Congratulations you completed the Quiz
Excellent! Great job! Bad luck! You scored:
x / y

Next 

Well done everyone! That's four different ways of using the word like you've studied now.That's enough grammar for this week! Now it's time for News Report.