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Session 5

Set sail for adventure

The Race Episode 2: Will it be plain sailing for Phil in his 80 day challenge? Plus, find out what you've learnt from unit 2 in our weekly quiz.

 

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Start the Clock!

u2_s5_drama_therace.jpg"It's Phil here. You may know that I've been set a challenge to sail around the world in 80 days - it's an impossible challenge especially as I have never sailed a yacht before. But I said 'yes' - so here goes!"

What examples of present simple and present continuous can you find in this episode? The answers are shown in bold in the transcript.

Listen to the audio

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Phil          

Hello again. It's Phil here. You may know that I've been set a challenge to sail around the world in80 days - it's an impossible challenge especially as I have never sailed a yacht before. But I said 'yes' - so here it goes...

Tom          

So, here we at Saint Catherine's Dock and look - here's my yacht - The Mermaid - I know she's a bit scruffy but I'm sure she'll get you round the world...

Phil           

Hmm, on my own! That's the bit that worries me. It's a very small boat.

Tom         

It's a yacht - not a boat - look: it's got a sail! Anyway, you'll be fine. Just call me on the satellite phone if you have any problems.

PP             

(Calling from afar) Hello, hi. Phil. Phil! It's me.

Phil           

Pete, what are you doing here?

Phil           

Pete is my office assistant: He makes the tea, he does the photocopying, he sometimes gives me ideas for my books. He's a great guy - so I'm really pleased to see him now...

PP             

Tom posted a message on Facebook that you're going on a trip round the world, or something. I couldn't believe my eyes - so I had to come here and see for myself. Look, I've brought you some books to read... and a map - you'll find that useful.

Phil           

I will... but what I really need is a travelling companion... someone who can help me on my journey... someone like you?! How about it?

PP              

No. Absolutely not. I can't. I've got to... errr... feed the cat.

Tom         

Ill feed your cat. Go on. Can't you see he needs your help!

PP            

I get sea-sick...

Phil           

Rubbish! I remember when you went sailing with your Dad - you were always fine.

PP           

That was different. We were sailing on a lake.

Phil           

Well, you know about sails and rope and anchors - you'd be great.  Besides, if you come with me you can have a share of the money.

Tom          

If you get home in 80 days!

Phil        

I'm pleased to report that Pete is joining me. I'm so pleased I have someone to 'show me the ropes', as it were - in other words, show me what to do. He's a good friend, a loyal assistant and he goes everywhere with me so I'm giving him the nickname 'Passepartout', just like in the original book, Around the World in Eighty Days - I hope he likes it!

Phil          

We've set sail. Our adventure has begun. Let me describe the yacht to you. It is 12 metres long. It has a huge mast, with the mainsail attached. There is an engine as well just in case there's no wind. The wooden deck has seating at the stern - that's the back. There are some steps down to the galley - that's the kitchen - and there are two berths or beds for us to sleep in. I can't believe we're going to live in this tiny space for 80 days!

PP            

Phil, we've got the wind in our sails, we're making good progress. I can't even see land any more.

Phil           

Yes. Thanks to you, it's plain sailing! So, what does this rope do?

PP             

It moves the jib - the sail at the front.

Phil          

And this one?

PP              

That moves the boom from side to side. No, no. But don't pull it until...

Phil            

Ouch! That hurt.

Phil            

Day 5 and I'm learning how to sail but my best skills are in the galley, making tea. The weather is good but we seem to have a problem with the yacht...

Phil          

Passepartout, is it me or is it getting a bit wet down in the galley?

PP              

Let me have a look. Oh dear! There's water all over the floor. I think the boat is leaking.

Phil            

What? What are we going to do?

PP             

Drown!

Phil            

What? Really? I'm going to get on the radio and call for help... Mayday! Mayday! Oh no. The radio isn't working. We're in big trouble!

PP             

Be quiet. Calm down Phil. The radio isn't turned on - and we don't need to abandon ship just yet. I need to know where this water is coming from. It's only a slow leak but I think we need to fix it quickly. We need to head for dry land.

Phil 

According to the map the nearest land is some islands at 16 degrees north, 24 degrees west. Do you know where that is? Let's hope we get there before we sink.

Download

You can download The Race - episode 2 from our Unit 2 downloads page or from our BBC Learning English Drama podcast page. (size 10MB)

 

Vocabulary: Sailing

seasick
feeling ill, vomiting or feeling you are going to vomit or be sick because of the movement of the ship or boat you are travelling in

stern
the back end of a ship or boat

galley
the kitchen in a ship, boat or plane

berths
beds in a ship, boat or train

plain sailing
an expression that means a job or task is going well, easily, without problems

So, Phil is in trouble already! Should he really have left home at all? You'll find out more in episode 3 of The Race. But, for now, watch Pete's video diary - he knows a lot of things about boats!

Session Vocabulary

  • seasick
    feeling ill, vomiting or feeling you are going to vomit or be sick because of the movement of the ship or boat you are travelling in

    stern
    the back end of a ship or boat

    galley
    the kitchen in a ship, boat or plane

    berths
    beds in a ship, boat or train

    plain sailing
    an expression that means a job or task is going well, easily, without problems