TV - Learning with the news

General tips:

Take notes and keep them in a notebook, binder or folder.

Make it easy for yourself - a bit at a time in your own time.

Make a regular date, based on how long and how often you can make it.

Be realistic about what you'll get out of it. It could be something as simple as hearing the language and training your ear to the way it sounds or picking out a couple of words.

Before watching:

International news and universal issues such as the environment, the economy, science, technology or sport may be easier to understand than intricate domestic stories requiring previous knowledge.

Select a story that suits your interests and time requirements.

You may find text versions or transcripts of the story elsewhere on the site. Make a note of key words and look up any you don't know.

Euronews does offer the script of the video story, but some words may have changed as the journalist reads it. It also offers an English version, but this is not a word-by-word translation.

If you have time to do so, try and find the story on an English website to find out a bit about the detail.

While watching:

You'll hear more than you can understand. Try watching through before going back and watching in smaller parts.

News delivery tends to be faster than in English.

Watch more than once. It may take a while to get your ear used to the language.

As you watch, try and answer the questions: who, what, when, where, why, how.

After watching:

How much can you understand every time you listen again? Keep a short record of your session.

Decide when your next session will be.

After four or five sessions, and if possible, try and watch one of the earlier clips again, referring to your notes. How much more can you understand?

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